New Books Network

Nadine Strossen, “Hate: Why We Should Resist it With Free Speech, Not Censorship” (Oxford UP, 2020)
The updated paperback edition of Hate: Why We Should Resist it With Free Speech, Not Censorship (Oxford University Press) dispels misunderstandings plaguing our perennial debates about “hate speech vs. free speech,” showing that the First Amendment approach promotes free speech and democracy, equality, and societal harmony. As “hate speech” has... Read More
Edward C. Valandra, “Colorizing Restorative Justice: Voicing Our Realities” (Living Justice Press, 2020)
Colorizing Restorative Justice: Voicing Our Realities (Living Justice Press, 2020) consists of stories that have arisen from the lived experiences of a broad range of seasoned, loving restorative justice practitioners of color—mostly women—who have fiercely unearthed realities about devastation caused by white practitioners who have unthinkingly worked without a racial... Read More
Alexander Kaye, “The Invention of Jewish Theocracy: The Struggle for Legal Authority in Modern Israel” (Oxford UP, 2020)
The tension between secular politics and religious fundamentalism is a problem shared by many modern states. This is certainly true of the State of Israel, where the religious-secular schism provokes conflict at every level of society. Driving this schism is the idea of the halakhic state, the demand by many... Read More
Gema Kloppe-Santamaría, “In the Vortex of Violence: Lynching, Extralegal Justice, and the State in Post-Revolutionary Mexico” (U California Press, 2020)
In her new book In the In the Vortex of Violence: Lynching, Extralegal Justice, and the State in Post-Revolutionary Mexico (University of California Press), Gema Kloppe-Santamaría examines the history of violence enacted by groups against alleged transgressors who claimed to bring justice while acting beyond the rule of law. Focusing... Read More
Carolyn J. Dean, “The Moral Witness: Trials and Testimony after Genocide” (Cornell UP, 2019)
The Moral Witness: Trials and Testimony after Genocide (Cornell University Press, 2019) is the first cultural history of the “witness to genocide” in the West. Carolyn J. Dean shows how the witness became a protagonist of twentieth-century moral culture by tracing the emergence of this figure in courtroom battles from... Read More
J. Herbst and S. Lovegrove, “Brexit And Financial Regulation” (Oxford UP, 2020)
The UK’s transition from legally withdrawing from the EU to leaving the union’s single market will come to an end at midnight on December 31 with no successor trade agreement yet in place. For the UK’s financial sector, which accounts for 7% of the country’s economy and a million of... Read More
Matthew D. Wright, “A Vindication of Politics: On the Common Good and Human Flourishing” (UP of Kansas, 2019)
Rancor reigns in American politics. Is it possible these days to regard politics as an arena that enriches and ennobles? Matthew D. Wright responds with a resounding yes in his 2019 book, A Vindication of Politics: On the Common Good and Human Flourishing (UP of Kansas, 2019). Wright takes issue... Read More
Sara Mayeux, “Free Justice: A History of the Public Defender in Twentieth-Century America” (UNC Press, 2020)
Sara Mayeux is the author of Free Justice: A History of the Public Defender in Twentieth-Century America, published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2020. Free Justice explores the rise, both in the idea and practice, of the public defender throughout the 20th Century. More than just a... Read More
Dan Edelstein, “On the Spirit of Rights” (U Chicago Press, 2018)
By the end of the eighteenth century, politicians in America and France were invoking the natural rights of man to wrest sovereignty away from kings and lay down universal basic entitlements. Exactly how and when did “rights” come to justify such measures? In On the Spirit of Rights (University of... Read More
Oumar Ba, “States of Justice: The Politics of the International Criminal Court” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
States of Justice: The Politics of the International Criminal Court (Cambridge University Press, 2020) theorizes the ways in which states that are presumed to be weaker in the international system use the International Criminal Court (ICC) to advance their security and political interests. Ultimately, the book contends that African states... Read More