New Books Network

Robert Nichols, “Theft Is Property!: Dispossession and Critical Theory” (Duke UP, 2019)
Robert Nichols, an associate professor of political theory at the University of Minnesota, has written an engaging and important examination of the clash between the western theoretical approaches to the idea of property and possession and the understanding of land property and possession held by indigenous peoples in a variety... Read More
Robert C. McGreevey, “Borderline Citizens: The United States, Puerto Rico, and the Politics of Colonial Migration” (Cornell UP, 2018)
In Borderline Citizens: The United States, Puerto Rico, and the Politics of Colonial Migration (Cornell University Press 2018), Robert C. McGreevey explores the contested meaning and limits of citizenship for Puerto Ricans from the late nineteenth century to the late 1930s. This timely monograph brings together legal, cultural, and labour... Read More
Paige Glotzer, “How the Suburbs Were Segregated: Developers and the Business of Exclusionary Housing, 1890-1960” (Columbia UP, 2020)
Paige Glotzer is the author of How the Suburbs Were Segregated: Developers and the Business of Exclusionary Housing, 1890-1960, published by Columbia University Press in 2020. How the Suburbs Were Segregated examines the history surrounding how modern housing segregation was purposefully planned out beginning at the turn of the 20th... Read More
Mona L. Siegel, “Peace on Our Terms: The Global Battle for Women’s Rights After the First World” (Columbia UP, 2020)
We are all familiar with the story of how in early 1919 heads of state and diplomats from around the world came to Paris to negotiate a peace settlement with a defeated Germany and its allies. Many of us are aware of how nationalists such as Nguyễn Ái Quốc, the... Read More
Kathleen Hale and Mitchell Brown, “How We Vote: Innovation in American Elections” (Georgetown UP, 2020)
The idea of voting is simple, but the administration of elections in ways that ensure access and integrity is complex. In How We Vote: Innovation in American Elections (Georgetown University Press, 2020), Kathleen Hale and Mitchell Brown explore how election officials work, how ballots are cast and counted, and how... Read More
Daniel Q. Gillion, “The Loud Minority: Why Protests Matter in American Democracy” (Princeton UP, 2020)
Political Scientist Daniel Q. Gillion’s new book, The Loud Minority: Why Protests Matter in American Democracy (Princeton University Press, 2020) is an incredibly topical and important analysis of the connection between protests and the influence this public activism has on the voting electorate. Tracing the idea of the “silent majority” from... Read More
A. D. Crosby and M. B. Lykes, “In Beyond Repair? Mayan Women’s Protagonism in the Aftermath of Genocidal Harm” (Rutgers UP, 2019)
In Beyond Repair? Mayan Women’s Protagonism in the Aftermath of Genocidal Harm (Rutgers University Press, 2019), Alison D. Crosby and M. Brinton Lykes draw on eight years of feminist participatory action research conducted with fifty-four Q’eqchi’, Kaqchikel, Chuj, and Mam women to explore Mayan women’s agency in their search for... Read More
Jennifer Holland, “Tiny You: A Western History of the Anti-Abortion Movement” (U California Press, 2020)
Although much has been written about the anti-abortion movement in the United States, Jennifer Holland (Assistant Professor of U.S. History, University of Oklahoma) has written the first monograph-length history of the pro-life campaign for American hearts and minds. In her book Tiny You: A Western History of the Anti-Abortion Movement... Read More
Gilda R. Daniels, “Uncounted: The Crisis of Voter Suppression” (NYU Press, 2020)
Are we asleep at the (common)wheel? Civil rights attorney and law professor Gilda R. Daniels insists that contemporary voter ID laws, voter deception, voter purges, and disenfranchisement of felons constitute a crisis of democracy – one that should remind us of past poll taxes, grandfather clauses, literacy tests, and physical... Read More