New Books Network

Philip Thai, “China’s War on Smuggling: Law, Illicit Markets, and State Power on the China Coast” (Columbia UP, 2018)
In this episode, Siobhan talks with Philip Thai about his book, China’s War on Smuggling: Law, Illicit Markets, and State Power on the China Coast (Columbia University Press, 2018). Thai is Assistant Professor of History at Northeastern University. He is a historian of Modern China with research and teaching interests that... Read More
Renisa Mawani, “Across Oceans of Law: The Komagata Maru and Jurisdiction in the Time of Empire” (Duke UP, 2018)
Renisa Mawani’s Across Oceans of Law: The Komagata Maru and Jurisdiction in the Time of Empire (Duke University Press), take us to 1914, when the British-built and Japanese-owned steamship Komagata Maru left Hong Kong for Vancouver carrying 376 Punjabi migrants. Chartered by railway contractor and purported rubber planter Gurdit Singh,... Read More
Colin Rose, “A Renaissance of Violence: Homicide in Early Modern Italy” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
On this episode of New Books in History, Jana Byars talks with Colin Rose, Assistant Professor of History at Brock University in St. Catherine’s, Ontario, Canada, about his new book, A Renaissance of Violence: Homicide in Early Modern Italy (Cambridge University Press, 2019). Seventeenth-century Bologna saw a severe uptick of... Read More
Will Smiley, “From Slaves to Prisoners of War: The Ottoman Empire, Russia, and International Law” (Oxford UP, 2018)
In his book From Slaves to Prisoners of War: The Ottoman Empire, Russia, and International Law (Oxford University Press, 2018), Will Smiley examines the emergence of rules of warfare surrounding captivity and slavery in the context of Ottoman-Russian military rivalry between 1700 and 1878. This remarkably well-researched and carefully argued... Read More
Julia Rose Kraut, “Threat of Dissent: A History of Ideological Exclusion and Deportation in the United States” (Harvard UP, 2020)
How does the United States use immigration to suppress free speech? Should interests of “national security” take priority over individual liberties? What happens to democracy when the most vulnerable are denied their right to speak and exchange ideas? In Threat of Dissent: A History of Ideological Exclusion and Deportation in... Read More
Ting Zhang, “Circulating the Code: Print Media and Legal Knowledge in Qing China” (U Washington Press, 2020)
How could a peasant in Shandong in the Qing dynasty come to know enough about a specific law that he felt confident enough to kill his own wife and his lover’s husband and think that he could get away with it? As Ting Zhang’s new book, Circulating the Code: Print... Read More
Adi Schwartz and Einat Wilf, “The War of Return: How Western Indulgence of the Palestinian Dream Has Obstructed the Path to Peace” (All Point Books, 2020)
Two prominent Israeli liberals argue that for the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians to end with peace, Palestinians must come to terms with the fact that there will be no “right of return.” In 1948, seven hundred thousand Palestinians were forced out of their homes by the first Arab-Israeli... Read More
Nathan Carlin, “Pastoral Aesthetics: A Theological Perspective on Principlist Bioethics” (Oxford UP, 2019)
It is often said that bioethics emerged from theology in the 1960s, and that since then it has grown into a secular enterprise, yielding to other disciplines and professions such as philosophy and law. During the 1970s and 1980s, a kind of secularism in biomedicine and related areas was encouraged... Read More
Michael A. Olivas, “Perchance to DREAM: A Legal and Political History of the DREAM Act and DACA” (NYU Press, 2020)
Why did the DREAM Act (for the Development, Relief, and Education of Alien Minors) never pass Congress – even though it was popular with Republicans and Democrats? What does the political and legal history tell us about American federalism? How is the legal history of the DREAM ACT and DACA... Read More
Poul Kjaer, “The Law of Political Economy: Transformation in the Function of Law” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
Legal and political theories are not descriptions of brute facts.  Nor are they merely postulated ideals or aspirations.  Theories reflect and are reflected in our social relationships … Moral and political values thus cannot and should not be discussed in isolation from the institutions and social histories that shaped them.... Read More