New Books Network

Gregory P. Downs, “The Second American Revolution” (UNC Press, 2019)
Much of the confusion about a central event in United States history begins with the name the “Civil War.” In reality, the Civil War was not merely civil–meaning national–and not merely a war, but instead an international conflict of ideas as well as armies. Its implications transformed the U.S. Constitution... Read More
Andrew Marble, “Boy on the Bridge: The Story of John Shalikashvili’s Remarkable Success” (UP of Kentucky, 2019)
When President Bill Clinton nominated John Shalikashvili to be the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in 1993, it represented the climax of a long journey that began in waning days of the Second World War. In Boy on the Bridge: The Story of John Shalikashvili’s Remarkable Success (University... Read More
Graham T. Clews, “Churchill’s Phoney War: A Study in Folly and Frustration” (Naval Institute Press, 2019)
Given the overwhelming amount of books printed in the past ten years on various (usually rather obscure) aspects of Sir Winston Churchill’s glorious career, it is of great interest that so little has been written about his activity during the Phoney War phase of the Second World War (1 September... Read More
David Head, “A Crisis of Peace: George Washington, the Newburgh Conspiracy, and the Fate of the American Revolution” (Pegasus Books, 2019)
In March 1783, George Washington confronted a meeting of disgruntled Continental Army officers at their encampment at Newburgh, New York. In his book A Crisis of Peace: George Washington, the Newburgh Conspiracy, and the Fate of the American Revolution (Pegasus Books, 2019), David Head explains the background to this meeting... Read More
Reider Payne, “War and Diplomacy in the Napoleonic Era” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019)
Though Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh remains well known today for his role in shaping the post-Napoleonic peace settlement in Europe, his half-brother Sir Charles Stewart has received far less attention despite his own prominent part in the politics and diplomacy of those years. In War and Diplomacy in the Napoleonic... Read More
Matthew Lockwood, “To Begin The World Over Again: How the American Revolution Devastated the Globe” (Yale UP, 2019)
Growing up as an American, you’re bound to be all-but-suffused with triumphalist histories of the American Revolution. Those histories might have a tough of the Hegelian to them, asserting that the Revolutionary War was part of the inevitable development of freedom worldwide. More academic histories have focused more critically on... Read More
Thomas Kühne, “The Rise and Fall of Comradeship: Hitler’s Soldiers, Male Bonding and Mass Violence in the Twentieth Century” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
In The Rise and Fall of Comradeship: Hitler’s Soldiers, Male Bonding and Mass Violence in the Twentieth Century (Cambridge University Press, 2017), Professor Thomas Kühne writes an innovative account of how the concept of comradeship shaped the actions, emotions and ideas of ordinary German soldiers across the two world wars... Read More
Roberto Carmack, “Kazakhstan in World War II: Mobilization and Ethnicity in the Soviet Empire” (UP of Kansas, 2019)
Roberto Carmack’s Kazakhstan in World War II: Mobilization and Ethnicity in the Soviet Empire (University Press of Kansas, 2019) looks at the experience of the Kazakh Republic during the Soviet Union’s Great Patriotic War. Using a variety of archival materials, newspapers, and individual memoirs, Carmack looks at important topics of... Read More