New Books Network

Jody A. Forrester, “Guns Under the Bed: Memories of a Young Revolutionary” (Odyssey Books, 2020)
It is 1969 and Jody A. Forrester is in her late teens, transitioning from a Sixties love child to pacifist anti-Vietnam War activist to an ardent revolutionary. Guns Under the Bed: Memories of a Young Revolutionary (Odyssey Books) revolves around her three years in the Revolutionary Union, a Communist organization... Read More
E. Bazzano and M. Hermansen, “Varieties of American Sufism” (SUNY Press, 2020)
Sufism in America is now a developed sub-field of study that exists at the intersection of Islamic Studies, American religions, and popular spirituality. Varieties of American Sufism: Islam, Sufi Orders, and Authority in a Time of Transition (State University of New York Press 2020) an edited volume by Elliott Bazzano... Read More
Joseph E. Davis, “Chemically Imbalanced: Everyday Suffering, Medication, and Our Troubled Quest for Self-Mastery” (U Chicago Press, 2020)
Everyday suffering—those conditions or feelings brought on by trying circumstances that arise in everyone’s lives—is something that humans have grappled with for millennia. But the last decades have seen a drastic change in the way we approach it. In the past, a person going through a time of difficulty might... Read More
David Livingstone Smith, “On Inhumanity: Dehumanization and How to Resist It” (Oxford UP, 2020)
The Rwandan genocide, the Holocaust, the lynching of African Americans, the colonial slave trade: these are horrific episodes of mass violence spawned from racism and hatred. We like to think that we could never see such evils again–that we would stand up and fight. But something deep in the human... Read More
Rachel V. González, “Quinceañera Style: Social Belonging and Latinx Consumer Identities” (U Texas Press, 2019)
A quinceañera is a traditional fifteenth birthday celebration for young women (though in contemporary times, it can also be for young men) in many Latinx communities.  While the celebration has roots in religiosity, it has also become a space for imagining and performing class, identity, and Americanity.  With fieldwork conducted... Read More
Julia Sneeringer, “A Social History of Early Rock ‘n’ Roll in Germany: Hamburg from Burlesque to The Beatles, 1956-69” (Bloomsbury, 2018)
The Beatles’ sojourn in the St. Pauli district of Hamburg during the early 1960s is part of music legend. As Julia Sneeringer reveals in A Social History of Early Rock ‘n’ Roll in Germany: Hamburg from Burlesque to The Beatles, 1956-69 (Bloomsbury, 2018), though, this was just the most famous... Read More
Jonathan Robinson, “Rights at the Margins: Historical, Legal and Philosophical Perspectives” (Brill, 2020)
The essays in Rights at the Margins: Historical, Legal and Philosophical Perspectives (Brill) explore the ways rights were available to those in the margins of society. By tracing pivotal judicial concepts such as ‘right of necessity’ and ‘subjective rights’ back to their medieval versions, and by situating them in unexpected... Read More
Zachary Dorner, “Merchants of Medicine: The Commerce and Coercion of Health in Britain’s Long 18th Century” (U Chicago Press, 2020)
In Merchants of Medicine: The Commerce and Coercion of Health in Britain’s Long Eighteenth Century (The University of Chicago Press), medicines embody the hopes of those who prepared, sold, and ingested them. By investigating the different contexts and practices associated with the British long-distance trade in patent medicines, Zachary Dorner... Read More
Despina Stratigakos, “Hitler’s Northern Utopia: Building the New Order in Occupied Norway” (Princeton UP, 2020)
In her new book Hitler’s Northern Utopia: Building the New Order in Occupied Norway (Princeton University Press, 2020), Despina Stratigakos investigates the Nazi occupation of Norway. Between 1940 and 1945, German occupiers transformed Norway into a vast construction zone. This remarkable building campaign, largely unknown today, was designed to extend the... Read More
Ann-elise Lewallen, “The Fabric of Indigeneity: Ainu Identity, Gender, and Settler Colonialism in Japan” (U New Mexico Press, 2016)
The Fabric of Indigeneity: Ainu Identity, Gender, and Settler Colonialism in Japan (University of New Mexico Press) is a recent addition to the growing scholarship on Ainu identity and settler colonialism in Japan. Combining ethnographic fieldwork in contemporary Ainu communities and organizations with museum and archival research, Dr. Lewallen shows... Read More