New Books Network

Omar H. Ali, “Malik Ambar: Power and Slavery across the Indian Ocean” (Oxford UP, 2016)
Omar H. Ali’s Malik Ambar: Power and Slavery across the Indian Ocean (Oxford University Press, 2016), provides insight into the life of slave soldier Malik Ambar. It offers a rare look at an individual who began in obscurity in the Horn of Africa and reached the highest levels of South... Read More
Alexander Keyssar, “Why Do We Still Have the Electoral College?” (Harvard UP, 2020)
The title of Harvard historian Alexander Keyssar,’s new book poses the question that comes up every presidential election cycle: Why Do We Still Have the Electoral College? (Harvard University Press, 2020). Keyssar presents the reader with a deep, layered, and complex analysis not only of the institution of the Electoral... Read More
Colleen Stanley, “Emotional Intelligence for Sales Leadership” (HarperCollins, 2020)
What does it take to connect successfully with somebody you’re trying to “win over”? Colllen Stanley explains in her new book Emotional Intelligence for Sales Leadership(HarperCollins, 2020) Stanley is the president of SalesLeadership, a sales development firm. She’s been named by Salesforce as one of the top sales influencers of... Read More
Victor McFarland, “Oil Powers: A History of the US-Saudi Alliance” (Columbia UP, 2020)
The relationship between the United States and Saudi Arabia is a critical feature of the modern international system. It binds the global hegemon to a region on the other side of the planet. And it has facilitated capitalist-led globalization. However, as both the US and and Saudi governments have tried... Read More
Jack Santino, “Public Performances: Studies in the Carnivalesque and Ritualesque” (UP Colorado, 2017)
Public Performances: Studies in the Carnivalesque and Ritualesque (University Press of Colorado) offers a deep and wide-ranging exploration of relationships among genres of public performance and of the underlying political motivations they share. Illustrating the connections among three themes—the political, the carnivalesque, and the ritualesque—the volume provides rich and comprehensive... Read More
Jean Jackson, “Managing Multiculturalism: Indigeneity and the Struggle for Rights in Colombia” (Stanford UP, 2019)
In Managing Multiculturalism: Indigeneity and the Struggle for Rights in Colombia (Stanford University Press) Jean Jackson narrates her remarkable journey as an anthropologist in Colombia for over 50 years. This is an extraordinary book because it shows us Jackson’s trajectory, the challenges she faced, the changes she underwent as a researcher... Read More
Kathryn Sikkink, “The Hidden Face of Rights: Toward a Politics of Responsibilities” (Yale UP, 2020)
In her latest book, The Hidden Face of Rights: Toward a Politics of Responsibilities (Yale University Press), Kathryn Sikkink puts forward a framework of rights and responsibilities; moving beyond the language of rights that has come to dominate scholarship and activism, she makes the case that human rights cannot be... Read More
Teresa A. Goddu, “Selling Antislavery: Abolition and Mass Media in Antebellum America” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020)
Selling Antislavery: Abolition and Mass Media in Antebellum America (University of Pennsylvania Press) is a richly illustrated history of the American Anti-Slavery Society and its print, material, and visual artifacts. Beginning with its establishment in the early 1830s, the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS) recognized the need to reach and consolidate... Read More
Ben Burgis, “Give Them an Argument: Logic for the Left” (Zero Books, 2019)
Logic, the study of how certain arguments either succeed or fail to support their conclusions, is one of the most important topics in philosophy, its importance illustrated by the common assumption that if one is being logical, they are probably right. However, the importance of logic has led to a... Read More
Nadine Strossen, “Hate: Why We Should Resist it With Free Speech, Not Censorship” (Oxford UP, 2020)
The updated paperback edition of Hate: Why We Should Resist it With Free Speech, Not Censorship (Oxford University Press) dispels misunderstandings plaguing our perennial debates about “hate speech vs. free speech,” showing that the First Amendment approach promotes free speech and democracy, equality, and societal harmony. As “hate speech” has... Read More