New Books Network

Reiland Rabaka, “Hip Hop’s Inheritance: From the Harlem Renaissance to the Hip Hop Feminist Movement” (Lexington Books, 2011)
Cultural movements don’t exist in vacuums. Consciously or not, all movements borrow from, and sometimes reject, those that came before. In Hip Hop’s Inheritance: From the Harlem Renaissance to the Hip Hop Feminist Movement (Lexington Books, 2011), the first in a trilogy of books that cast a critical eye upon... Read More
Janet Kourany, “Philosophy of Science After Feminism” (Oxford UP, 2010)
Do social values belong in the sciences? Exploring the relationship between science, society, and politics, Philosophy of Science After Feminism (Oxford UP, 2010) provides a map for a more socially and politically engaged philosophy of science. Janet Kourany‘s book is a service to scholars and interested readers across the many... Read More
Brendan C. Lindsay, “Murder State: California’s Native American Genocide, 1846-1873” (University of Nebraska Press, 2012)
Brendan C. Lindsay‘s impressive if deeply troubling new book centers on two concepts long considered anathema: democracy and genocide. One is an ideal of self-government, the other history’s most unspeakable crime. Yet as Lindsay deftly describes, Euro-American settlers in California harnessed democratic governance to expel, enslave and ultimately murder 90%... Read More
Guy Fraser-Sampson, “Cricket at the Crossroads: Class, Colour and Controversy from 1967 to 1977” (Elliott & Thompson, 2011)
During the 1960s attendance fell at cricket grounds across England. Just as the Church of England lost members in droves in the same period, it appeared that this other pillar of English tradition was becoming irrelevant amidst the social and cultural developments of the times. Making the situation worse were... Read More
James M. Banner, Jr., “Being a Historian: An Introduction to the Professional World of History” (Cambridge UP, 2012)
What is a historian? How are they trained? What do they do? What should they do? Are they doing it well? These important questions addressed in James M. Banner, Jr.‘s excellent Being a Historian: An Introduction to the Professional World of History (Cambridge University Press, 2012). Banner knows whereof he... Read More
Antonio Guistozzi, “The Art of Coercion: The Primitive Accumulation and Management of Coercive Power ” (Hurst, 2012)
Today we have been talking to Antonio Guistozzi about his new book The Art of Coercion: The Primitive Accumulation and Management of Coercive Power (Hurst, 2012). Antonio has written an analysis of how groups obtain and maintain their monopoly on violence in a community. This may not seem relevant to... Read More
Alan Christy (trans.), Amino Yoshihiko, “Rethinking Japanese History” (Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan, 2012)
We don’t often make the chance to properly acknowledge the importance of translation to the understanding of history, let alone to talk about it at any length. Alan Christy has done a wonderful service in his careful, elegant, and accessible translation of Amino Yoshihiko‘s Rethinking Japanese History (Center for Japanese... Read More