New Books Network

Kathleen Klaus, “Political Violence in Kenya: Land, Elections, and Claim-Making” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
Kathleen Klaus, Assistant Professor of Politics at the University of San Francisco has written a terrific book, Political Violence in Kenya: Land, Elections, and Claim-Making published in 2020 by Cambridge University Press.  Kathleen’s book is richly researched and beautifully written. She draws on 15 months of survey and interview methods... Read More
Daniel P. Aldrich, “Black Wave: How Networks and Governance Shaped Japan’s 3/11 Disasters” (U Chicago Press, 2020)
Despite the devastation caused by the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and 60-foot tsunami that struck Japan in 2011, some 96% of those living and working in the most disaster-stricken region of Tōhoku made it through. Smaller earthquakes and tsunamis have killed far more people in nearby China and India. What accounts... Read More
H. Eric Schockman, “Peace, Reconciliation and Social Justice Leadership in the 21st Century” (Emerald, 2019)
In Peace, Reconciliation and Social Justice Leadership in the 21st Century: The Role of Leaders and Followers (Emerald, 2019) co-edited by Dr. H. Eric Schockman, Vanessa Alexandra Hernandez Soto, and Aldo Boitano de Moras, expert contributors explore ways that leaders and followers can bring forth pacifism, peace building, nonviolence, forgiveness,... Read More
Michael A. Olivas, “Perchance to DREAM: A Legal and Political History of the DREAM Act and DACA” (NYU Press, 2020)
Why did the DREAM Act (for the Development, Relief, and Education of Alien Minors) never pass Congress – even though it was popular with Republicans and Democrats? What does the political and legal history tell us about American federalism? How is the legal history of the DREAM ACT and DACA... Read More
Saqib Iqbal Qureshi, “The Broken Contract: Making Our Democracies Accountable, Representative, and Less Wasteful” (Lioncrest, 2020)
A democracy should reflect the views of its citizens and offer a direct connection between government and those it serves. So why, more than ever, does it seem as if our government exists in its own bubble, detached from us? In reality, our democracy is not performing as it should,... Read More
Juan Pablo Scarfi, “The Hidden History of International Law in The Americas: Empires and Legal Networks” (Oxford UP, 2017)
In his book The Hidden History of International Law in The Americas: Empires and Legal Networks (Oxford University Press, 2017), Juan Pablo Scarfi shows the central role of a coterie of elite Latin American jurists and intellectuals in constructing a Pan-American inflected conception of international law. In exploring the rise... Read More
Iraj Bashiri, “The History of the Civil War in Tajikistan” (Academic Studies Press, 2020)
In The History of the Civil War in Tajikistan (Academic Studies Press, 2020) Iraj Bashiri provides an overview of the Civil War in Tajikistan that emerged amidst the collapse of the Soviet Union. Based on personal observations, interviews, and a variety of primary and secondary publications, Bashiri places the conflict... Read More
Lindsay M. Chervinsky, “The Cabinet: George Washington and the Creation of an American Institution” (Harvard UP, 2020)
In her new book, The Cabinet: George Washington and the Creation of an American Institution (Harvard University Press, 2020), historian Lindsay M. Chervinsky traces the origins of the President’s cabinet in American government. Chervinsky combines the history of the American Revolution with studies of early American political institutions to illustrate how... Read More
Amity Shlaes, “Great Society: A New History” (Harper, 2019)
National concern about income inequalities. Race relations at a boiling point. Riots in the streets. Cries on the left for massive allocations of federal money for housing and poverty reduction programs. Social scientists and professional activists touting theories and pet proposals for projects that will supposedly eradicate poverty if only... Read More