New Books Network

Jonathan D. T. Ward, “China’s Vision of Victory” (Atlas Publishing, 2019)
Someday we may say that we never saw it coming. After seventy-five years of peace in the Pacific, a new challenger to American power has emerged, on a scale not seen since the Soviet Union at its height. With a deep if partially contrived sense of national destiny, the Chinese... Read More
Morgan Marietta, “One Nation, Two Realities: Dueling Facts in American Democracy” (Oxford UP, 2019)
American society is deeply divided at this moment—not just on values and opinions but on basic perceptions of reality. In their latest book, One Nation, Two Realities: Dueling Facts in American Democracy (Oxford University Press, 2019), Morgan Marietta and David Barker attribute such division to the natural human tendency towards... Read More
Hye-Kyung Lee, “Cultural Policy in South Korea: Making a New Patron State” (Routledge, 2018)
Why does Korean cultural policy matter? In Cultural Policy in South Korea: Making a New Patron State (Routledge, 2018), Hye-Kyung Lee, a Senior Lecturer in Cultural and Creative Industries at Kings College, London, demonstrates the importance of South Korea is both an example in comparative cultural policy, and as a fascinating... Read More
Anthony J. Badger, “Albert Gore, Sr.: A Political Life” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2019)
In 1956 Albert Gore, Sr. received national attention as one of only three senators from the states of the former Confederacy who refused to sign the infamous “Southern Manifesto” opposing the racial integration of public spaces. Lauded as Gore was by many for his decision, as Anthony J. Badger shows... Read More
David Karol, “Red, Green, and Blue: The Partisan Divide on Environmental Issues” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
David Karol’s new book, Red, Green, and Blue: The Partisan Divide on Environmental Issues (Cambridge UP, 2019), examines the history of environmental policy as it has operated within or as it has been integrated into American political parties. He ably integrates the early conservation movement into the discussion, providing foundational understandings... Read More
David Milne, “Worldmaking: The Art and Science of American Diplomacy” (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2015)
There are countless ways to study the history of U.S. foreign policy. David Milne, however, makes the case that it is “often best understood” as “intellectual history.” In his innovative book, Worldmaking: The Art and Science of American Diplomacy (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2015), follows the lives and ideas of... Read More
Rachel Augustine Potter, “Bending the Rules: Procedural Politicking in the Bureaucracy” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Rule-making may rarely make headlines, but the significance of this largely hidden process cannot be underestimated. Rachel Augustine Potter makes the case in Bending the Rules: Procedural Politicking in the Bureaucracy (University of Chicago Press, 2019) that rulemaking is incredibly important, but also political in ways that are misunderstood. Potter... Read More