New Books Network

J. E. Zelizer, “Burning Down the House: Newt Gingrich, the Fall of a Speaker, and the Rise of the New Republican Party” (Penguin, 2020)
Nearly everyone in the United States is aware of the fiery rhetoric and divisive political stratagems of Donald Trump and the contemporary Republican party. What many people forget, however, is that Trump is not the first Republican to rise to power by pushing incendiary policies and destroying opponents. Julian E.... Read More
Thomas A. Schwartz, “Henry Kissinger and American Power: A Political Biography” (Hill and Wang, 2020)
Over the past six decades, Henry Kissinger has been America’s most consistently praised–and reviled–public figure. He was hailed as a “miracle worker” for his peacemaking in the Middle East, pursuit of détente with the Soviet Union, negotiation of an end to the Vietnam War, and secret plan to open the... Read More
Oumar Ba, “States of Justice: The Politics of the International Criminal Court” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
States of Justice: The Politics of the International Criminal Court (Cambridge University Press, 2020) theorizes the ways in which states that are presumed to be weaker in the international system use the International Criminal Court (ICC) to advance their security and political interests. Ultimately, the book contends that African states... Read More
R. G. Boatright and V. Sperling, “Trumping Politics as Usual: Masculinity, Misogyny, and the 2016 Elections” (Oxford UP, 2019)
How did the Trump and Hillary Clinton campaigns affect other elections in 2016? How did the use of gender stereotypes and insulting references to women in the presidential campaign influence the way House and Senate candidates campaigned? The 2016 American elections forced scholars and candidates to reassess the role that... Read More
Jennie C. Ikuta, “Contesting Conformity: Democracy and the Paradox of Political Belonging” (Oxford UP, 2020)
In her new book, Contesting Conformity: Democracy and the Paradox of Political Belonging (Oxford University Press, 2020), political theorist Jennie C. Ikuta traces the idea of nonconformity and how this often-lauded idea can be a significant challenge for modern democracy, especially in the United States. The United States is often... Read More
John R. Hibbing, “The Securitarian Personality: What Really Motivates Trump’s Base and Why It Matters for the Post-Trump Era” (Oxford UP, 2020)
What are the policy implications due to a fundamental distrust and dislike of “outsiders”? Today I talked to political scientist John R. Hibbing about his new book The Securitarian Personality: What Really Motivates Trump’s Base and Why It Matters for the Post-Trump Era (Oxford UP, 2020) Hibbing teaches political science... Read More
Lisa Levenstein, “They Didn’t See Us Coming: The Hidden History of Feminism in the Nineties” (Basic Books, 2020)
Lisa Levenstein is the Director of the Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program and an associate professor of history at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. Her current book They Didn’t See Us Coming: The Hidden History of Feminism in the Nineties (Basic Books, 2020) shows how American feminists joined... Read More
Benjamin Talton, “In This Land of Plenty: Mickey Leland and Africa in American Politics” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2019)
In This Land of Plenty: Mickey Leland and Africa in American Politics (University of Pennsylvania Press) by Benjamin Talton is a transnational history that explores the influence of African American leaders on US foreign policy towards Africa in the 1980s. By examining the life and labors of the political activist... Read More
Roman David and Ian Holliday, “Liberalism and Democracy in Myanmar” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Democracy is a popular topic among scholars of politics in Southeast Asia. Liberalism is not. Or at least it hadn’t been up until the last few years, which have seen a spate of books with liberalism in the title: on Islam in Indonesia, capitalism in Singapore, post-colonialism in the Philippines,... Read More
Julia Rose Kraut, “Threat of Dissent: A History of Ideological Exclusion and Deportation in the United States” (Harvard UP, 2020)
How does the United States use immigration to suppress free speech? Should interests of “national security” take priority over individual liberties? What happens to democracy when the most vulnerable are denied their right to speak and exchange ideas? In Threat of Dissent: A History of Ideological Exclusion and Deportation in... Read More