New Books Network

James Zogby, “The Tumultuous Decade: Arab Public Opinion and the Upheavals of 2010-2019” (Steuben Press, 2020)
James Zogby’s The Tumultuous Decade: Arab Public Opinion and the Upheavals of 2010–2019 (Steuben Press, 2020) takes the reader on a decade-long tour of the Middle East as the region reverberates from popular revolts that toppled long-standing dictators, civil and proxy wars that sparked some of the world’s worst humanitarian crises,... Read More
James C. Pearce, “The Use of History in Putin’s Russia” (Vernon Press, 2020)
History matters in Russia. It really matters, so much so that the state has a “historical policy” to help legitimize itself and support its policy agenda. The Use of History in Putin’s Russia (Vernon Press, 2020), James C. Pearce examines how the past is perceived in contemporary Russia and analyses... Read More
Nathan J. Kelly, “America’s Inequality Trap” (U Chicago Press, 2020)
America’s Inequality Trap (University of Chicago Press, 2020) focuses on the relationship between economic inequality and American politics. Nathan J. Kelly, Professor of Political Science at the University of Tennessee, argues that the increasing concentration of economic power effects political power, thus allowing the gap between the rich and everyone... Read More
Matthew D. Wright, “A Vindication of Politics: On the Common Good and Human Flourishing” (UP of Kansas, 2019)
Rancor reigns in American politics. Is it possible these days to regard politics as an arena that enriches and ennobles? Matthew D. Wright responds with a resounding yes in his 2019 book, A Vindication of Politics: On the Common Good and Human Flourishing (UP of Kansas, 2019). Wright takes issue... Read More
Adam Hanieh, “Money, Markets, and Monarchies: The Gulf Cooperation Council and the Political Economy of the Contemporary Middle East” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
When most Westerners think of the Gulf, the first thing that comes to mind is often oil. However, as Adam Hanieh demonstrates in Money, Markets, and Monarchies: The Gulf Cooperation Council and the Political Economy of the Contemporary Middle East (Cambridge UP, 2018), the economies of Saudi Arabia, the UAE,... Read More
Philip Nash, “Breaking Protocol: America’s First Female Ambassadors, 1933-1964” (UP of Kentucky, 2020)
“It used to be,” soon-to-be secretary of state Madeleine K. Albright said in 1996, “that the only way a woman could truly make her foreign policy views felt was by marrying a diplomat and then pouring tea on an offending ambassador’s lap.” This world of US diplomacy excluded women for... Read More
Charisse Burden-Stelly, “W.E.B. Du Bois: A Life in American History” (ABC-CLIO, 2019)
Why is the scholarship and advocacy work of W.E.B. Du Bois so relevant for 21st century politics? Does his unique combination of both serve as a possible template for today’s freedom movements? Dr. Charisse Burden-Stelly (assistant professor of Africana Studies and Political Science at Carleton College and 2020-2021 Visiting Scholar... Read More
J. E. Zelizer, “Burning Down the House: Newt Gingrich, the Fall of a Speaker, and the Rise of the New Republican Party” (Penguin, 2020)
Nearly everyone in the United States is aware of the fiery rhetoric and divisive political stratagems of Donald Trump and the contemporary Republican party. What many people forget, however, is that Trump is not the first Republican to rise to power by pushing incendiary policies and destroying opponents. Julian E.... Read More
Thomas A. Schwartz, “Henry Kissinger and American Power: A Political Biography” (Hill and Wang, 2020)
Over the past six decades, Henry Kissinger has been America’s most consistently praised–and reviled–public figure. He was hailed as a “miracle worker” for his peacemaking in the Middle East, pursuit of détente with the Soviet Union, negotiation of an end to the Vietnam War, and secret plan to open the... Read More
Oumar Ba, “States of Justice: The Politics of the International Criminal Court” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
States of Justice: The Politics of the International Criminal Court (Cambridge University Press, 2020) theorizes the ways in which states that are presumed to be weaker in the international system use the International Criminal Court (ICC) to advance their security and political interests. Ultimately, the book contends that African states... Read More