New Books Network

Michael A. Olivas, “Perchance to DREAM: A Legal and Political History of the DREAM Act and DACA” (NYU Press, 2020)
Why did the DREAM Act (for the Development, Relief, and Education of Alien Minors) never pass Congress – even though it was popular with Republicans and Democrats? What does the political and legal history tell us about American federalism? How is the legal history of the DREAM ACT and DACA... Read More
Lesly-Marie Buer, “RX Appalachia: Stories of Treatment and Survival in Rural Kentucky” (Haymarket, 2020)
Using the narratives of women who use(d) drugs, this account challenges popular understandings of Appalachia spread by such pundits as JD Vance by documenting how women, families, and communities cope with generational systems of oppression. Prescription opioids are associated with rising rates of overdose deaths and hepatitis C and HIV... Read More
Saqib Iqbal Qureshi, “The Broken Contract: Making Our Democracies Accountable, Representative, and Less Wasteful” (Lioncrest, 2020)
A democracy should reflect the views of its citizens and offer a direct connection between government and those it serves. So why, more than ever, does it seem as if our government exists in its own bubble, detached from us? In reality, our democracy is not performing as it should,... Read More
Aya Gruber, “The Feminist War on Crime: The Unexpected Role of Women’s Liberation in Mass Incarceration” (U California Press, 2020)
Aya Gruber, a professor of law at the University of Colorado Law School, has written a history of how the women’s movement in America has shaped the law on domestic violence and sexual assault. In The Feminist War on Crime: The Unexpected Role of Women’s Liberation in Mass Incarceration (University... Read More
David A. Harris, “A City Divided: Race, Fear and the Law in Police Confrontations” (Anthem Press, 2020)
How do we move police forces from a warrior culture to connecting better with communities they serve? Today I talked to David A. Harris about his new book A City Divided: Race, Fear and the Law in Police Confrontations (Anthem Press, 2020). Harris is a professor at the University of... Read More
Amity Shlaes, “Great Society: A New History” (Harper, 2019)
National concern about income inequalities. Race relations at a boiling point. Riots in the streets. Cries on the left for massive allocations of federal money for housing and poverty reduction programs. Social scientists and professional activists touting theories and pet proposals for projects that will supposedly eradicate poverty if only... Read More
Solomon Goldstein-Rose, “The 100% Solution: A Plan for Solving Climate Change” (Melville House, 2020)
At age 26, Solomon Goldstein-Rose has already spent more time thinking about climate change than most of us will in our lifetimes. He’s been a climate activist since age 11, studied engineering and public policy to understand what physically has to happen to solve climate change, and served in the... Read More
M. C. Stevenson et al. (eds.), “The Legacy of Racism for Children: Psychology, Law and Public Policy” (Oxford UP, 2020)
When children become entangled with the law, their lives can be disrupted irrevocably. When those children are underrepresented minorities, the potential for disruption is even greater. The Legacy of Racism for Children: Psychology, Law and Public Policy (Oxford University Press) examines issues that arise when minority children’s lives are directly... Read More
Jan Doering, “Us versus Them: Race, Crime, and Gentrification in Chicago Neighborhoods” (Oxford UP, 2020)
With such high levels of residential segregation along racial lines in the United States, gentrifying neighborhoods present fascinating opportunities to examine places with varying levels of integration, and how people living in them navigate the thorny politics of race. Among the many conflicts revolving around race under gentrification is crime... Read More
Verónica Martínez-Matsuda, “Migrant Citizenship: Race, Rights, and Reform in the U.S. Farm Labor Camp Program” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020)
Verónica Martínez-Matsuda about her book Migrant Citizenship: Race, Rights, and Reform in the U.S. Farm Labor Camp Program (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2020). Migrant Citizenship exams the Farm Security Administration’s Migratory Labor Camp Program, and its role in the daily lives of a diverse number of farmworker families. Martínez-Matsuda thoroughly... Read More