New Books Network

Yehoshua November, “Two Worlds Exist” (Orison Books, 2016)
Yehoshua November’s second poetry collection, Two Worlds Exist (Orison Books), movingly examines the harmonies and dissonances involved in practicing an ancient religious tradition in contemporary America. November’s beautiful and profound meditations on work and family life, and the intersections of the sacred and the secular, invite the reader–regardless of background–to... Read More
Audrey Truschke, “Aurangzeb: The Life and Legacy of India’s Most Controversial King” (Stanford UP, 2017)
For many, the history of the Mughal empire looms heavy over contemporary South Asian social imaginaries. The lightning rod figure within modern day myths about the past is the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb (1618-1707). Some think of him as a violent Muslim fanatic who went out of his way to oppress... Read More
Tamar Herzig, “A Convert’s Tale: Art, Crime, and Jewish Apostasy in Renaissance Italy” (Harvard UP, 2019)
On this episode of New Books in History, Jana Byars talks with Tamar Herzig, Professor of History at Tel Aviv University, the Director of Tel Aviv University’s Morris E Curiel Institute for European Studies, and as the Vice Chairperson of the Historical Society of Israel about her new book, A... Read More
Kristin Kobez Du Mez, “Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation” (Liveright, 2020)
One of the most perplexing elements of Donald Trumps’s 2016 electoral victory was the overwhelming support he received from white Evangelicals, a demographic that has stubbornly clung to him in the face of everything he has done. The fact that a thrice-married reality-TV star has been able to hold onto... Read More
Eryn M. White, “The Welsh Methodist Society: The Early Societies in South-West Wales 1737-1750” (U Wales Press, 2020)
Eryn White, who is Reader in Welsh history at Aberystwyth University, Wales, has written an outstanding new book on the beginnings of Welsh evangelicalism. The Welsh Methodist Society: The Early Societies in South-West Wales 1737-1750 (University of Wales Press, 2020) focuses on the movement that became known as the Calvinistic... Read More
Mel Schwartz, “The Possibility Principle: How Quantum Physics Can Improve the Way You Think, Live, and Love” (Sounds True, 2017)
How would you like to experience your life? It’s an intriguing question, and yet we’ve been conditioned to believe our life visions and goals are often unattainable—until now. With The Possibility Principle: How Quantum Physics Can Improve the Way You Think, Live, and Love (Sounds True, 2017), psychotherapist Mel Schwartz... Read More
Richard G. Moore, “The Writings of Oliver Olney: April 1842 to February 1843-Nauvoo, Illinois” (Greg Kofford Books, 2020)
Oliver H. Olney, an early convert to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, fled to Nauvoo, Illinois, following persecution in Missouri. In Nauvoo, Olney became disgruntled with church leadership and viewed Joseph Smith as a fallen prophet. His writings, consisting of journal entries, letters, and booklets, express his... Read More
Crawford Gribben, “An Introduction to John Owen: A Christian Vision for Every Stage of Life” (Crossway, 2020)
Though theology is often regarded as dealing primarily with abstract issues of belief, the prolific 17th-century English Puritan John Owen focused much of his attention on the role of Christian faith in one’s everyday life. In his book An Introduction to John Owen: A Christian Vision for Every Stage of... Read More
Rafael Medoff, “The Jews Should Keep Quiet: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, and the Holocaust” (JPS, 2019)
Like so many Americans, American Jews supported President Roosevelt. They adored him. They believed in him. They idolized him. Perhaps they shouldn’t have. Based on recently discovered documents, The Jews Should Keep Quiet: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, and the Holocaust (Jewish Publication Society) reassesses the hows and... Read More
John Barton, “A History of the Bible: The Story of the World’s Most Influential Book” (Viking, 2019)
John Barton is no stranger to Holy Scripture. Having spent much of his academic career as a chaplain and professor of theology at the University of Oxford, his latest book is an attempt to shed light on one of the world’s most influential texts – the Bible. In A History... Read More