New Books Network

Philip W. Clements, “Science in an Extreme Environment: The American Mount Everest Expedition” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2018)
Historian of Science Philip W. Clements discusses the 1963 American Mount Everest Expedition. His book, Science in an Extreme Environment: The American Mount Everest Expedition, is now out with University of Pittsburgh Press (2018). Part I, originally posted in November 2017, focuses on the goals and events of the expedition.... Read More
David Munns, “Engineering the Environment: Phytotrons and the Quest for Climate Control in the Cold War” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2017)
“Phytotron” is such a great name for something that is, when you look at it, a high-tech greenhouse. But don’t sell it short! The phytotron was not only at the center of post-war plant science, but also connected to the Cold War, commercial agriculture, and long-duration space flight. Today I... Read More
David Karol, “Red, Green, and Blue: The Partisan Divide on Environmental Issues” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
David Karol’s new book, Red, Green, and Blue: The Partisan Divide on Environmental Issues (Cambridge UP, 2019), examines the history of environmental policy as it has operated within or as it has been integrated into American political parties. He ably integrates the early conservation movement into the discussion, providing foundational understandings... Read More
Gökçe Günel, “Spaceship in the Desert: Energy, Climate Change, and Urban Design in Abu Dhabi” (Duke UP, 2019)
Whether in space colonies or through geo-engineering, the looming disaster of climate change inspires no shortage of techno-utopian visions of human survival. Most of such hypotheses remain science fiction, but in Spaceship in the Desert: Energy, Climate Change, and Urban Design in Abu Dhabi (Duke University Press, 2019), Gökçe Günel... Read More
Kris Lane, “Potosí: The Silver City That Changed the World” (U California Press, 2019)
In 1545, a native Andean prospector hit pay dirt on a desolate red mountain in highland Bolivia. There followed the world’s greatest silver bonanza, making the Cerro Rico or “Rich Hill” and the Imperial Villa of Potosí instant legends, famous from Istanbul to Beijing. The Cerro Rico alone provided over... Read More
Jennifer Thomson, “The Wild and the Toxic: American Environmentalism and the Politics of Health” (UNC Press, 2019)
The first wealth is health, according to Emerson. Among health’s riches is its political potential. Few know this better than environmentalists. In her debut book, The Wild and the Toxic: American Environmentalism and the Politics of Health (UNC Press, 2019), historian Jennifer Thomson revisits canonical figures and events from the... Read More
Rosalyn LaPier, “Invisible Reality: Storytellers, Storytakers, and the Supernatural World of the Blackfeet” (U Nebraska Press, 2017)
In Invisible Reality: Storytellers, Storytakers, and the Supernatural World of the Blackfeet (University of Nebraska Press, 2017), author Rosalyn LaPier, an associate professor in environmental studies at the University of Montana, complicates several narratives about Native people and the nonhuman world. Rather than “living in harmony with nature,” as stereotyped... Read More