New Books Network

Cassia Roth, “A Miscarriage of Justice: Women’s Reproductive Lives and the Law in Early Twentieth-Century Brazil” (Stanford UP, 2020)
While the negotiation of ideals of nationhood and citizenship have traditionally fallen under the purview of landmark court decisions, state reforms, and the political exigencies of statesmen, Cassia Roth‘s new book A Miscarriage of Justice: Women’s Reproductive Lives and the Law in Early Twentieth-Century Brazil (Stanford University Press, 2020) chooses to... Read More
Amy Koerber, “From Hysteria to Hormones: A Rhetorical History” (Penn State UP, 2018)
On this episode of the New Books Network, Dr. Lee Pierce (she/they) interviews Dr. Amy Koerber (she/hers), Professor at Texas Tech University, on the groundbreaking book From Hysteria to Hormones: A Rhetorical History (Penn State University Press, 2018). Filled with fresh takes on classical rhetorical theories, From Hysteria is an... Read More
Paul Nahin, “Hot Molecules, Cold Electrons” (Princeton UP, 2020)
Hot Molecules, Cold Electrons: From the Mathematics of Heat to the Development of the Trans-Atlantic Telegraph Cable (Princeton University Press, 2020), by Paul Nahin, is a book that is meant for someone who is comfortable with calculus, but for those readers who are, it is a treat. It is a... Read More
Owen Whooley, “On the Heels of Ignorance: Psychiatry and the Politics of Not Knowing” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Psychiatry has always aimed to peer deep into the human mind, daring to cast light on its darkest corners and untangle its thorniest knots, often invoking the latest medical science in doing so.  But, as Owen Whooley’s sweeping new book tells us, peering deep into the human mind is, well,... Read More
Arthur Asseraf, “Electric News in Colonial Algeria” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Arthur Asseraf’s Electric News in Colonial Algeria (Oxford University Press, 2019) examines the workings of the “news ecosystem” in Algeria from the 1880s to the beginning of the Second World War. The study of a society divided between a dominant (European) settler minority and an Algerian Muslim majority, the book... Read More
G. Clinton Godart, “Darwin, Dharma, and the Divine: Evolutionary Theory and Religion in Modern Japan” (U Hawaii Press, 2017)
In Darwin, Dharma, and the Divine. Evolutionary Theory and Religion in Modern Japan (University of Hawaii Press, 2017), G. Clinton Godart (Associate Professor at Tohoku University’s Department of Global Japanese Studies) brings to life more than a century of ideas by examining how and why Japanese intellectuals, religious thinkers of... Read More
Adrian Currie, “Rock, Bone, and Ruin: An Optimist’s Guide to the Historical Sciences” (MIT Press, 2018)
The “historical sciences”—geology, paleontology, and archaeology—have made extraordinary progress in advancing our understanding of the deep past. How has this been possible, given that the evidence they have to work with offers mere traces of the past? In Rock, Bone, and Ruin: An Optimist’s Guide to the Historical Sciences (MIT... Read More