New Books Network

Valerie Olson, “Into the Extreme: U.S. Environmental Systems and Politics Beyond Earth” (U Minnesota Press, 2019)
Valerie Olson talks about why the idea of outer space as a “frontier” is giving way to one that frames it as a cosmic ecosystem. Olson is an associate professor of anthropology at University of California, Irvine. She is the author of Into the Extreme: U.S. Environmental Systems and Politics... Read More
Theodore Dalrymple, “False Positive: A Year of Error, Omission, and Political Correctness in the New England Journal of Medicine” (Encounter Books, 2019)
Theodore Dalrymple is a retired physician in Great Britain, who has written an account of his year’s-worth of reading the New England Journal of Medicine. In his new book False Positive: A Year of Error, Omission, and Political Correctness in the New England Journal of Medicine (Encounter Books, 2019), he... Read More
David Lindsay Roberts, “Republic of Numbers: Unexpected Stories of Mathematical Americans through History” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2019)
The institutional history of mathematics in the United States comprises several entangled traditions—military, civil, academic, industrial—each of which merits its own treatment. David Lindsay Roberts, adjunct professor of mathematics at Prince George’s Community College, takes a very different approach. His unique book, Republic of Numbers: Unexpected Stories of Mathematical Americans... Read More
Elizabeth DeLoughrey, “Allegories of the Anthropocene” (Duke UP, 2019)
While the mainstream discourses on global warming characterize it as an unprecedented catastrophe that unites the globe in a common challenge, Elizabeth DeLoughrey argues that this apparently cosmopolitan position is in truth a provincial one limited to privileged circles in the Global North. In Allegories of the Anthropocene (Duke University... Read More
David D. Vail, “Chemical Lands: Pesticides, Aerial Spraying, and Health in North America’s Grasslands since 1945” (U Alabama Press, 2018)
Over fifty years ago, Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (1962) scolded the agricultural industry for its profligate spread of “poison” and pesticides “indiscriminately from the skies.” Now, in Chemical Lands: Pesticides, Aerial Spraying, and Health in North America’s Grasslands since 1945 (University of Alabama Press, 2018), David D. Vail re-examines aerial... Read More
Thomas Hager, “Ten Drugs: How Plants, Powders, and Pills Have Shaped the History of Medicine” (Harry N. Abrams, 2019)
Behind every landmark drug is a story. It could be a researcher’s genius insight, a catalyzing moment in geopolitical history, a new breakthrough technology, or an unexpected but welcome side effect discovered during clinical trials. In his new book, Ten Drugs: How Plants, Powders, and Pills Have Shaped the History... Read More
Oren Harman, “Evolutions: Fifteen Myths That Explain Our World” (FSG, 2018)
“There are only two ways to live your life,” said Albert Einstein, “One is as though nothing is a miracle; the other is as though everything is a miracle.” Oren Harman clearly agrees with Einstein’s sentiments. In Evolutions: Fifteen Myths That Explain Our World (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2018), Harman... Read More