New Books Network

Tom Wheeler, “From Gutenberg to Google: The History of Our Future” (Brookings, 2019)
It’s easy to get sidetracked while writing a book. But imagine being interrupted by the President of the United States. That happened to Tom Wheeler, who was in the midst of writing a history of communication networks when President Obama appointed him to be chairman of the Federal Communications Commission... Read More
Tina Sikka, “Climate Technology, Gender, and Justice: The Standpoint of the Vulnerable” (Springer, 2019)
How can feminist theory help address the climate crisis? In Climate Technology, Gender, and Justice: The Standpoint of the Vulnerable (Springer Verlag, 2019), Tina Sikka, a lecturer in media and cultural studies at the University of Newcastle, considers the limitations of our current approach to climate change, and the means through which... Read More
Discussion of Massive Online Peer Review and Open Access Publishing
In the information age, knowledge is power. Hence, facilitating the access to knowledge to wider publics empowers citizens and makes societies more democratic. How can publishers and authors contribute to this process? This podcast addresses this issue. We interview Professor Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick, whose book, The Good Drone: How Social Movements... Read More
Michael C. Desch, “Cult of the Irrelevant: The Waning Influence of Social Science on National Security” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Many have read and debated “How Political Science became Irrelevant” in The Chronicle of Higher Education. The author of that piece is Michael C. Desch and much it comes from his recent book Cult of the Irrelevant: The Waning Influence of Social Science on National Security (Princeton University Press, 2019).... Read More
Gregory Dawes, “Galileo and the Conflict between Religion and Science” (Routledge, 2016)
Open conflict between religion and science may not be inevitable, but a germ of discord resides in some of the fundamental commitments of both; in this sense, war is always, potentially, just around the corner. In Galileo and the Conflict between Religion and Science (Routledge, 2016), Gregory Dawes uses the... Read More