New Books Network

Olivia Weisser, “Ill Composed: Sickness, Gender, and Belief in Early Modern England” (Yale UP, 2015)
On this episode of New Books in History, Jana Byars talks with Olivia Weisser, Associate Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts – Boston, to talk about her 2015 Yale University Press release, Ill Composed: Sickness, Gender, and Belief in Early Modern England.  Olivia Weisser can be described as... Read More
T. Paulus and A. Wise, “Looking for Insight, Transformation, and Learning in Online Talk ” (Routledge, 2019)
In this episode, I speak with Dr. Trena Paulus of East Tennessee State University and Dr. Alyssa Wise of New York University on their new book, Looking for Insight, Transformation, and Learning in Online Talk (Routledge, 2019). The book offers a comprehensive discussion of conducting research on online talk, which... Read More
Sarah B. Rodriguez, “The Love Surgeon: A Story of Trust, Harm, and the Limits of Medical Regulation” (Rutgers UP, 2020)
Dr. James Burt believed women’s bodies were broken, and only he could fix them. In the 1950s, this Ohio OB-GYN developed what he called “love surgery,” a unique procedure he maintained enhanced the sexual responses of a new mother, transforming her into “a horny little house mouse.” Burt did so... Read More
Philip Butler, “Black Transhuman Liberation Theology: Technology and Spirituality” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019)
In his book Black Transhuman Liberation Theology: Technology and Spirituality (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019), Philip Butler explores what might happen if Black people in the United States merged technology and spirituality in their fight towards materializing liberating realities. The discussions shaping what it means for humans to exist with technology and... Read More
Solomon Goldstein-Rose, “The 100% Solution: A Plan for Solving Climate Change” (Melville House, 2020)
At age 26, Solomon Goldstein-Rose has already spent more time thinking about climate change than most of us will in our lifetimes. He’s been a climate activist since age 11, studied engineering and public policy to understand what physically has to happen to solve climate change, and served in the... Read More
Paulo Drinot, “The Sexual Question: A History of Prostitution in Peru, 1850s-1950s” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
Paulo Drinot’s The Sexual Question: A History of Prostitution in Peru, 1850s-1950s (Cambridge University Press, 2020) studies the interplay of sexuality, society, and the state in Peru in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Drinot analyzes the rules and norms that governed prostitution and venereal disease in this period, and tracks how... Read More
Sasha Costanza-Chock, “Design Justice: Community-Led Practices to Build the Worlds We Need” (MIT Press, 2020)
In Design Justice: Community-Led Practices to Build the Worlds We Need (MIT Press, 2020), Sasha Costanza-Chock, an associate professor of Civic Media at MIT, builds the case for designers and researchers to make the communities they impact co-equal partners in the products, services, and organizations they create. This requires more than... Read More
Andrew Kettler, “The Smell of Slavery: Olfactory Racism and the Atlantic World” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
In his new book, The Smell of Slavery: Olfactory Racism and the Atlantic World (Cambridge University Press, 2020), Dr. Andrew Kettler charts the impact that smell had on the making of race and justifications for enslavement in the Atlantic world. Western European defined the African subject as a scented object,... Read More
Sandra Postel, “Replenish: The Virtuous Cycle of Water and Prosperity” (Island Press, 2020)
In Replenish: The Virtuous Cycle of Water and Prosperity (Island Press), Sandra Postel acknowledges society’s past mishaps with managing water and emphasizes our future is contingent upon rehabilitating our science, tech, and political solutions.  To understand our past and provide hope for our future Sandra takes readers around the world to explore water projects that work with,... Read More