New Books Network

Violet Moller, “The Map of Knowledge: A Thousand-Year History of How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found” (Doubleday, 2019)
Violet Moller has written a narrative history of the transmission of books from the ancient world to the modern. In The Map of Knowledge: A Thousand-Year History of How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found (Doubleday, 2019), Moller traces the histories of migration of three ancient authors, Euclid, Ptolemy and Galen,... Read More
Okezi Otovo, “Progressive Mothers, Better Babies: Race, Public Health, and the State in Brazil, 1850-1945” (U Texas Press, 2016)
Okezi Otovo’s Progressive Mothers, Better Babies: Race, Public Health, and the State in Brazil, 1850-1945 (U Texas Press, 2016) explores the intersecting histories of race, gender, and class in modern Brazil. Between 1850 and 1945, the period covered in the book, Brazil experienced a range of profound socio-political transformations: from... Read More
Vanessa Heggie, “Higher and Colder: A History of Extreme Physiology and Exploration” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Vanessa Heggie talks about the history of biomedical research in extreme environments. Heggie is a Fellow of the Institute for Global Innovation at the University of Birmingham. She is the author of Higher and Colder: A History of Extreme Physiology and Exploration (University of Chicago Press, 2019). During the long... Read More
Donna Dickenson, “Me Medicine vs. We Medicine: Reclaiming Biotechnology for the Common Good” (Columbia UP, 2016)
Personalized healthcare―or what the award-winning author Donna Dickenson calls “Me Medicine”―is radically transforming our longstanding “one-size-fits-all” model. Technologies such as direct-to-consumer genetic testing, pharmacogenetically developed therapies in cancer care, private umbilical cord blood banking, and neurocognitive enhancement claim to cater to an individual’s specific biological character, and, in some cases,... Read More
David R. Montgomery, “Growing a Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life” (W. W. Norton, 2018)
In Growing a Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life (W. W. Norton & Co., 2018), Dr. David R. Montgomery portrays hope amidst the backdrop that for centuries, agricultural practices have eroded the soil that farming depends on, stripping it of the organic matter vital to its productivity. Once a self-proclaimed... Read More
Juan Pablo Pardo-Guerra, “Automating Finance: Infrastructures, Engineers, and the Making of Electronic Markets” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
How are markets made? In Automating Finance: Infrastructures, Engineers, and the Making of Electronic Markets (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Juan Pablo Pardo-Guerra, an assistant professor in sociology at the University of California, San Diego, explores the history of the finance industry to understand the role of markets and technologies in... Read More
Tita Chico, “The Experimental Imagination: Literary Knowledge and Science in the British Enlightenment” (Stanford UP, 2018)
Can science be seductive? According to Tita Chico, the answer is a resounding yes. In her new book, The Experimental Imagination: Literary Knowledge and Science in the British Enlightenment (Stanford University Press, 2018), Dr. Chico’s new book upends the traditional, modern dichotomies which enforce strict separations between literature and science.... Read More