New Books Network

David Munns, “Engineering the Environment: Phytotrons and the Quest for Climate Control in the Cold War” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2017)
“Phytotron” is such a great name for something that is, when you look at it, a high-tech greenhouse. But don’t sell it short! The phytotron was not only at the center of post-war plant science, but also connected to the Cold War, commercial agriculture, and long-duration space flight. Today I... Read More
Nicholas Shea, “Representation in Cognitive Science” (Oxford UP, 2018)
In order to explain thought in natural physical systems, mainstream cognitive science posits representations, or internal states that carry information about the world and that are used by the system to guide its behavior. Naturalistic theories of representation provide explanations of what information, or content, these internal states carry, and... Read More
Stephan Bullard, “A Day-by-Day Chronicle of the 2013-2016 Ebola Outbreak” (Springer, 2018)
Why did Ebola, a virus so deadly that it killed or immobilized its victims within days, have time to become a full-blown epidemic? That’s what happened in 2013 when the virus, already well-known to virologists and epidemiologists, broke out in West Africa, infecting twenty-eight thousand people and killing eleven thousand.... Read More
Chelsea Biondolillo, “The Skinned Bird” (Kernpunkt Press, 2019)
If you’ve ever flipped a large rock over to see what was underneath and encountered dark sludge, the movement of insects, and the stirring of your own fascination, then you know something about the project that Chelsea Biondolillo undertakes in her debut essay collection, The Skinned Bird (Kernpunkt Press, 2019).... Read More
Matthew Hersch, “Inventing the American Astronaut” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)
It seems logical that would NASA select military test pilots to be the first astronauts, right? They were used to risk. They were good with machines. They already explored extreme environments. But these skills were not unique to test pilots. There were also mountaineers, scuba divers, and explorers. They too... Read More
Eric Topol, “Deep Medicine: How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Healthcare Human Again” (Basic Books, 2019)
Medicine has lost its humanity. Doctors no longer have the time to make personal connections with their patients. In his new book Deep Medicine: How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Healthcare Human Again (Basic Books, 2019), Eric Topol explores how AI can help to fix many of the issues medicine is... Read More
Jessica Pierce, “Unleashing Your Dog: A Field Guide to Giving Your Canine Companion the Best Life Possible” (New World Library, 2019)
No matter how cushy their lives, dogs live on our terms. They compromise their freedom and instinctual pleasure, as well as their innate strategies for coping with stress and anxiety, in exchange for the love, comfort, and care they get from us. But it is possible to let dogs be... Read More