New Books Network

Adi Schwartz and Einat Wilf, “The War of Return: How Western Indulgence of the Palestinian Dream Has Obstructed the Path to Peace” (All Point Books, 2020)
Two prominent Israeli liberals argue that for the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians to end with peace, Palestinians must come to terms with the fact that there will be no “right of return.” In 1948, seven hundred thousand Palestinians were forced out of their homes by the first Arab-Israeli... Read More
Paula Fredriksen, “When Christians Were Jews: The First Generation” (Yale UP, 2018)
How did a group of charismatic, apocalyptic Jewish missionaries, working to prepare their world for the impending realization of God’s promises to Israel, end up inaugurating a movement that would grow into the gentile church? Committed to Jesus’s prophecy—“The Kingdom of God is at hand!”—they were, in their own eyes,... Read More
Fay Bound Alberti, “A Biography of Loneliness: The History of an Emotion” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Before the global pandemic of Covid-19 arrived, public health experts in the U.S. and U.K. were warning of the epidemic of loneliness. Loneliness steals more years of life than obesity. Loneliness is as much of a risk as smoking. Loneliness shortens a lifespan as much as poverty. It is associated... Read More
Stephan Talty, “The Good Assassin” (HMH, 2020)
History that reads like a thriller; The Good Assassin: How A Mossad Agent and a Band of Survivors Hunted Down The Butcher of Latvia (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2020) by Stephan Talty is the untold story of an Israeli spy’s epic journey to bring the notorious Butcher of Latvia to justice—a... Read More
Pehr Granqvist, “Attachment in Religion and Spirituality: A Wider View” (Guilford Press, 2020)
Attachment theory is a popular lens through which psychologists have examined human development and interpersonal dynamics. In Attachment in Religion and Spirituality: A Wider View (Guilford Press, 2020), Pehr Granqvist uses that lens to examine the psychology of religion and spirituality. He focuses on the connections between early caregiving experiences,... Read More
Cailin O’Connor, “The Misinformation Age: How False Beliefs Spread” (Yale UP, 2018)
The social dynamics of “alternative facts”: why what you believe depends on who you know Why should we care about having true beliefs? And why do demonstrably false beliefs persist and spread despite bad, even fatal, consequences for the people who hold them? In The Misinformation Age: How False Beliefs... Read More
Yael Tamir, “Why Nationalism?” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Around the world today, nationalism is back—and it’s often deeply troubling. Populist politicians exploit nationalism for authoritarian, chauvinistic, racist, and xenophobic purposes, reinforcing the view that it is fundamentally reactionary and antidemocratic. But Yael (Yuli) Tamir makes a passionate argument for a very different kind of nationalism—one that revives its... Read More
Richard G. Tedeschi, “Posttraumatic Growth: Theory, Research and Applications” (Routledge, 2018)
During this global pandemic, many of us will experience trauma, which the authors define as a severely stressful life-altering event.  A traumatic event is like an earthquake, shattering an individual’s coherent world-view the way an earthquake can shatter the foundations of buildings.  A traumatic event is undesirable in the extreme... Read More
Adrian J. Boas, “The Crusader World” (Routledge, 2015)
The Crusader World (Routledge, 2015), edited by Adrian J. Boas, is a multidisciplinary survey of the current state of research in the field of crusader studies, an area of study which has become increasingly popular in recent years. In this volume Adrian Boas draws together an impressive range of academics,... Read More