New Books Network

Cecilia Caballero et al.

The Chicana M(other)work Anthology

Porque Sin Madres No Hay Revolucion

University of Arizona Press 2019

New Books in American StudiesNew Books in EducationNew Books in Gender StudiesNew Books in Latino StudiesNew Books in Peoples & PlacesNew Books in Politics & SocietyNew Books in SociologyNew Books Network August 28, 2019 David-James Gonzales

In The Chicana M(other)work Anthology: Porque Sin Madres No Hay Revolucion (University of Arizona Press, 2019) editors Cecilia Caballero, Yvette Martinez-Vu, Judith Perez-Torres, Michelle...

In The Chicana M(other)work Anthology: Porque Sin Madres No Hay Revolucion (University of Arizona Press, 2019) editors Cecilia Caballero, Yvette Martinez-Vu, Judith Perez-Torres, Michelle Tellez, and Christine Vega, bring together a diverse collective of Women of Color Mother-Scholars to end the silence experienced by Mothers of Color in academia. In this expansive collection of research, testimonios, and essays, the authors share the networks, tools, and strategies created by working-class Women of Color as they confront and overcome societal and institutional barriers to pursuing higher education and advancing in the professorate. Chicana M(other)work, the editors explain, is “care work that includes the care provided in homes, classrooms, communities, and selves.” As such, this labor permeates and informs the praxis performed by Mothers of Color in their overlapping spheres of influence. As part of the larger Chicana M(other)work Project, which includes managing a website, blog, podcast, and engaging in grassroots activism, this anthology serves as a rallying call and platform for Mothers of Color seeking to transform communities, universities, and societal institutions from the bottom-up.


David-James Gonzales (DJ) is Assistant Professor of History at Brigham Young University. He is a historian of the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands, the development of multi-ethnic/racial cities, and the evolution of Latina/o identity and politics. His research centers on the relationship between Latina/o politics and the metropolitan development of Orange County, CA throughout the 20th century. You may follow him on Twitter @djgonzoPhD.