Bob Lenz, Justin Wells, and Sally Kingston

Transforming Schools

Using Project-Based Learning, Performance Assessment, and Common Core Standards

Jossey-Bass 2015

New Books in EducationNew Books in Politics & SocietyNew Books in Public PolicyNew Books Network April 18, 2016 Trevor Mattea

All of us are familiar with multiple-choice tests. They may be the one thing that you can find in kindergarten classrooms, college courses, and...

All of us are familiar with multiple-choice tests. They may be the one thing that you can find in kindergarten classrooms, college courses, and workplace training programs. But why are they so common? Multiple-choice tests may be the simplest and easiest way to see if someone knows something — or at least that someone probably knows something. No one would contend that this form of assessment moves beyond the lowest levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy — remembering and understanding. Of course, we want students — and employees — who can do more than that. What kinds of assessments can measure whether someone can apply, analyze, evaluate, or create something? How would teachers prepare students for those evaluations? How would schools promote those practices? In Transforming Schools: Using Project-Based Learning, Performance Assessment, and Common Core Standards (Jossey-Bass, 2015), Bob Lenz and co-authors Justin Wells and Sally Kingston outline a series of practices designed to promote higher levels of cognition as well as the means to implement them school wide.

Wells joins New Books in Education for the interview. You can find more information about his work with Envision Schools on its website. To share your thoughts on the podcast, you can connect with him on Twitter at @jusowells. You can reach the host on Twitter at @tsmattea.


Trevor Mattea is an educational consultant and speaker. His areas of expertise include deeper learning, parent involvement, project-based learning, and technology integration. He can be reached at [email protected].