New Books Network

Aaron Hale-Dorrell, “Corn Crusade: Khrushchev’s Farming Revolution in the Post-Stalin Soviet Union” (Oxford UP, 2018)
In Corn Crusade: Khrushchev’s Farming Revolution in the Post-Stalin Soviet Union (Oxford University Press, 2018), Aaron Hale-Dorrell re-evaluates Khrushchev’s corn campaign as the cornerstone of his reformation programs. Corn was key to Khrushchev’s promises of providing everyone with the abundance required for achieving communism, which included the introduction of a... Read More
Travis Rieder, “In Pain: A Bioethicist’s Personal Struggle with Opioids” (Harper Collins, 2019)
On a spring day in 2015, Dr. Travis Rieder’s life changed. A motorcycle accident, a shattered foot, and a long series of surgeries later, the Johns Hopkins University bioethicist had a far deeper understanding of opioid use in America than he ever planned. In his new book In Pain: A... Read More
Jeffrey Ostler, “Surviving Genocide: Native Nations and the United States from the American Revolution to Bleeding Kansas” (Yale UP, 2019)
Jeffrey Ostler’s Surviving Genocide: Native Nations and the United States from the American Revolution to Bleeding Kansas (Yale University Press, 2019) is the first of what will be a two-volume set that comprehensively chronicles the devastating effects of U.S. expansionism on Native Nations. Surviving Genocide covers the eastern United States... Read More
Alexandra Minna Stern, “Proud Boys and the White Ethnostate: How the Alt-Right Is Warping the American Imagination” (Beacon Press, 2019)
In this episode, Dr. Alexandra Minna Stern and I discuss her latest book, Proud Boys and the White Ethnostate: How the Alt-Right Is Warping the American Imagination (Beacon Press, 2019). Our conversation examines the intersections of gender and sexuality as they relate to the author’s research on eugenics, white nationalists,... Read More
Chiara Russo Krauss, “Wundt, Avenarius and Scientific Psychology: A Debate at the Turn of the Twentieth Century” (Palgrave MacMillan, 2019)
At the start of the 19th century, the field we now call psychology was still the branch of philosophy that studied the soul. How did psychology come to define itself as a separate area of inquiry, and how did it come to be a science? In Wundt, Avenarius and Scientific... Read More
Kate Kirkpatrick, “Becoming Beauvoir: A Life” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019)
Kate Kirkpatrick is a lecturer in Religion, Philosophy and Culture at King’s College London and author of Becoming Beauvoir: A Life (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019). Kirkpatrick has given us a biography that addresses the puzzle and contradictions of the life of the philosopher Simone de Beauvoir, drawn from never-before-published diaries and... Read More
William Sturkey, “Hattiesburg: An American City in Black and White” (Harvard UP, 2019)
If you really want to understand Jim Crow—what it was and how African Americans rose up to defeat it—you should start by visiting Mobile Street in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, the heart of the historic black downtown. There you can see remnants of the shops and churches where, amid the violence and... Read More