New Books Network

Roundtable Discussion of Jennifer Morgan's 'Laboring Women: Reproduction and Gender in New World Slavery' (UPenn Press, 2004)

New Books Network 2020

New Books in African American StudiesNew Books in American StudiesNew Books in Caribbean StudiesNew Books in Gender StudiesNew Books in HistoryNew Books in Peoples & PlacesNew Books in Politics & SocietyNew Books Network September 10, 2020 Adam McNeil

Welcome to New Books in African American Studies, a channel on the New Books Network. I am your host Adam McNeil. Today is part...

Welcome to New Books in African American Studies, a channel on the New Books Network. I am your host Adam McNeil. Today is part 2 of my discussion about Dr. Jennifer L. Morgan’s 2004 Laboring Women: Reproduction and Gender in New World Slavery. Instead of Dr. Morgan, who was featured in part 1 of the discussion, I enlisted a few #Blktwitterstorians to pull up to the pod and discuss the importance of Dr. Morgan’s Laboring Women to the field of slavery studies, gender and sexuality studies, and other fields, along with why Laboring Women is so important to each scholar, and also where the field of slavery studies is going.

My guests are:

Dr. Natasha Lightfoot, associate professor of history at Columbia University, a historian of slavery and emancipation studies, and black identities, politics, and cultures in the fields of Caribbean, Atlantic World, and African Diaspora History.

Dr. Jessica Marie Johnson, assistant professor of history at the Johns Hopkins University, a historian of black diasporic freedom struggles from slavery to emancipation + as a digital humanist, Johnson explores ways digital and social media disseminate and create historical narratives, in particular, comparative histories of slavery and people of African descent.

Halle Ashby, PhD Student in History at the Johns Hopkins University. Ashby is a historian of Caribbean slavery and emancipation, and her research concerns questions about gender, reproduction, and sexuality. Let me tell y’all, the conversation you are about to witness, is…. *chef’s kiss. Sit back, and enjoy the ride y’all!


Adam McNeil is a third-year PhD Student in History at Rutgers University, the State University of New Jersey. McNeil is a historian of Black women’s political histories during the American Revolutionary era.