For all of the books written about Winston Churchill, much remains to be said about his extensive life and career. In Churchill: Walking With...

For all of the books written about Winston Churchill, much remains to be said about his extensive life and career. In Churchill: Walking With Destiny (Viking, 2018), Andrew Roberts takes advantage of newly available archival holdings – most notably the diaries of King George VI – to add to our understanding of this vitally important figure. Churchill’s life was never short of drama; born in Blenheim Palace, he spent his early years as a correspondent and a soldier in Britain’s imperial wars before embarking on his long political career. Initially a Conservative like his father, he rose rapidly after joining the Liberal Party, though he switched back after the First World War. His period in the political wilderness in the 1930s was the result of his stands on India and the threat posed by Nazi Germany, with his return to office coming only with Great Britain’s entry into the Second World War. As Roberts explains, his successful wartime leadership came in the face of numerous domestic and international challenges, from colleagues plotting his downfall to the eclipse of British power with the rise of the American and Soviet superpowers, all of which had to be addressed for Britain to triumph in the end.