New Books Network

Alex Broadbent, “Philosophy of Medicine” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Alex Broadbent‘s Philosophy of Medicine (Oxford University Press, 2019)  asks two central questions about medicine: what is it, and what should we think of it? Philosophy of medicine itself has evolved in response to developments in the philosophy of science, especially with regard to epistemology, positioning it to make contributions... Read More
John D. Hawks, “Almost Human: The Astonishing Tale of Homo naledi and the Discovery That Changed Our Human Story” (National Geographic, 2017)
John D. Hawks talks about new developments in paleoanthropology – the discovery of a new hominid species Homo Naledi in South Africa, the Neanderthal ancestry of many human populations, and the challenge of rethinking anthropological science’s relationship with indigenous peoples and the general public. Hawks is the Vilas-Borghesi Achievement Professor... Read More
James W. Pardew, “Peacemakers: American Leadership and the End of Genocide in the Balkans” (U Kentucky Press, 2017)
In his book  Peacemakers: American Leadership and the End of Genocide in the Balkans (University of Kentucky Press, 2017), Ambassador James W. Pardew describes the role of the U.S. involvement in ending the wars and genocide in the Balkans.  As a soldier-diplomat, Pardew reminds us of the human nature of diplomacy. ... Read More
Thomas A. Foster, “Rethinking Rufus: Sexual Violations of Enslaved Men” (U Georgia Press, 2019)
Rethinking Rufus: Sexual Violations of Enslaved Men (University of Georgia Press, 2019) is the first book-length study of sexual violence against enslaved men. Scholars have extensively documented the widespread sexual exploitation and abuse suffered by enslaved women, with comparatively little attention paid to the stories of men. However, a careful... Read More
E. Danto and A. Steiner-Strauss, “Freud/Tiffany: Anna Freud, Dorothy Tiffany Burlingham and the Best Possible School” (Routledge, 2018)
When we imagine Anna Freud, how does she appear to us? I have a snapshot image in my mind of a woman, almost nondescript, decidedly meek, standing usually near her father, Sigmund Freud.  Her posture, bad from years spent stooping towards him, reflects not that of a woman, with her... Read More
Emilie Le Beau Lucchesi, “This Is Really War: The Incredible True Story of a Navy Nurse POW in the Occupied Philippines” (Chicago Review Press, 2019)
In her new book, This Is Really War: The Incredible True Story of a Navy Nurse POW in the Occupied Philippines (Chicago Review Press, 2019), Emilie Le Beau Lucchesi presents the largely unknown story of the US Navy nurses captured by the Japanese in the Philippines during World War II.... Read More
Robert Atkinson and Michael Lind, “Big is Beautiful: Debunking the Myth of Small Business” (MIT Press, 2018)
Small is beautiful, right? Isn’t that what we’ve all been taught? From Jeffersonian politics to the hallowed family farm, from craft breweries to tech start ups in the garage. Small business is the engine and the soul and the driver of the American system. That’s the dominant narrative. And according... Read More