New Books Network

David Woodbridge, “Missionary Primitivism and Chinese Modernity: The Brethren in Twentieth-Century China” (Brill, 2019)
Drawing on new archival resources, and opening up an entirely new research agenda in the field, David Woodbridge has written an outstanding new book. Missionary Primitivism and Chinese Modernity: The Brethren in Twentieth-Century China (Brill, 2019) focuses on a small but very significant evangelical community, the so-called Plymouth Brethren, and... Read More
Jennifer Thomson, “The Wild and the Toxic: American Environmentalism and the Politics of Health” (UNC Press, 2019)
The first wealth is health, according to Emerson. Among health’s riches is its political potential. Few know this better than environmentalists. In her debut book, The Wild and the Toxic: American Environmentalism and the Politics of Health (UNC Press, 2019), historian Jennifer Thomson revisits canonical figures and events from the... Read More
Toby Green, “A Fistful of Shells: West Africa from the Rise of the Slave Trade to the Age of Revolution” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
All too often, the history of early modern Africa is told from the perspective of outsiders. In his book A Fistful of Shells: West Africa from the Rise of the Slave Trade to the Age of Revolution (University of Chicago Press, 2019), Toby Green draws upon a range of underutilized... Read More
Nico Slate, “Gandhi’s Search for the Perfect Diet: Eating with the World in Mind” (U Washington Press, 2019)
In this this interview, Carrie Tippen talks with Nico Slate, professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University, about the intersections between diet, spirituality, health, and politics for one of the world’s most famous nonviolent political activists, Mahatma Gandhi. Dr. Slate, who researches anti-racist activism in the United States and India,... Read More
J. Dyck and E. Lascher, “Initiatives without Engagement: A Realistic Appraisal of Direct Democracy’s Secondary Effects” (U Michigan Press, 2019)
Ballot initiatives offer voters the chance to directly determine the outcome of state policy change. Do Americans who vote on initiatives grow in political efficacy and participate more in the future? Or is the initiative process ultimately undemocratic in the sense that those who participate grow less interested in participating... Read More
Max Edelson, “The New Map of Empire: How Britain Imagined America before Independence” (Harvard UP, 2017)
When we think of the history of the British Empire we tend to think big: oceans were crossed; colonies grew from small settlements to territories many times larger than England; entire Continents, each with substantial indigenous populations, were brought under British rule. Maps were an important part of rule in... Read More