James G. Cantres

Nov 17, 2021

Blackening Britain

Caribbean Radicalism from Windrush to Decolonization

Rowman and Littlefield 2020

Covering the period from the interwar years through the arrival of the steamship SS Empire Windrush from Jamaica in 1948 and culminating in the period of decolonization in the British Caribbean by the early 1970s, James Cantres’ Blackening Britain: Caribbean Radicalism from Windrush to Decolonization (Rowman & Littlefield, 2020) situates the development of networks of communication, categories of identification, and Caribbean radical politics both in the metropole and abroad. Cantres explores how articulations of Caribbean identity formation corresponded to the following themes: organic collective action, political mobilization, cultural expressions of shared consciousness, and novel patterns of communication. Blackening Britain shows how colonial migrants developed tools of resistance in the imperial center predicated on their racialized consciousness that emerged from their experiences of alienation and discrimination in Britain.

Blackening Britain interrogates the ways in which prominent West Indian activists, intellectuals, political actors, and artists conceived of their relationship to Britain. Ultimately, this work shows a move away from British identity and a radical, revolutionary consciousness rooted in the West Indian background and forged in the contentious space of metropolitan Britain.

Purchase a copy of Blackening Britain: From Windrush to Decolonization through January 8, 2022, using the Promo code: 21JOYSALE for 35% off at Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Amanda Joyce Hall is a Ph.D. Candidate in History and African American Studies at Yale University. She is writing an international history on the Black-led grassroots movement against South African apartheid during the 1970s and 1980s. She tweets from @amandajoycehall

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Amanda Joyce Hall

Amanda Joyce Hall is a Ph.D. Candidate in History and African American Studies at Yale University. She is writing an international history on the global movement against South African apartheid during the 1970s and 1980s. She tweets from @amandajoycehall.

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