New Books Network

Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, “The Age of Phillis” (Wesleyan UP, 2020)
Jennifer J. Davis speaks with Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, Professor of English at the University of Oklahoma, about The Age of Phillis (Wesleyan UP, 2020), Jeffers’s latest collection of poems centered on the remarkable life of America’s first poet of African descent, Phillis Wheatley Peters. The Society of Early Americanists recently... Read More
Joshua C. Myers, “We Are Worth Fighting For: A History of the Howard University Student Protest of 1989” (NYU Press, 2019)
We Are Worth Fighting For: A History of the Howard University Student Protest of 1989 (NYU Press, 2019) is the first history of the 1989 Howard University protest. The three-day occupation of the university’s Administration Building was a continuation of the student movements of the sixties and a unique challenge to... Read More
Edward J. Robinson, “Hard-Fighting Soldiers: A History of African American Churches of Christ” (U Tennessee Press, 2019)
In his new book Hard-Fighting Soldiers: A History of African American Churches of Christ (University of Tennessee Press, 2019), Edward J. Robinson provides a comprehensive look at the church’s improbable development against a backdrop of African American oppression. The journey begins with a lesser known preacher, F. F. Carson, in... Read More
Tsedale Melaku, “You Don’t Look Like a Lawyer: Black Women and Systemic Gendered Racism” (Rowman and Littlefield, 2019)
What kind of discrimination do Black women face in the legal profession? Tsedale Melaku explores this question and more in her new book: You Don’t Look Like a Lawyer: Black Women and Systemic Gendered Racism (Rowman & Littlefield, 2019). Using in-depth interviews with Black women about their lived experiences working... Read More
Zerlina Maxwell, “The End of White Politics: How to Heal Our Liberal Divide” (Hachette, 2020)
After working on two presidential campaigns (for Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton), MSNBC political analyst and SiriusXM host Zerlina Maxwell gained first-hand knowledge of everything liberals have been doing right over the past few elections–and everything they are still doing wrong. Ultimately, these errors worked in President Donald Trump’s favor... Read More
François Clemmons, “Officer Clemmons: A Memoir” (Catapult, 2020)
In Officer Clemmons: A Memoir (Catapult, 2020), François Clemmons tells the story of how he became the first ever African-American recurring character on a children’s television when he took on the role of the friendly police officer in Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood. But this book is more than a behind-the-scenes show... Read More
Robert T. Chase, “We Are Not Slaves: State Violence, Coerced Labor, and Prisoners’ Rights in Postwar America” (UNC Press, 2020)
In this episode, Siobhan talks with Robert T. Chase about his book, We Are Not Slaves: State Violence, Coerced Labor, and Prisoners’ Rights in Postwar America (UNC Press, 2020). In the early twentieth century, the brutality of southern prisons became a national scandal. Prisoners toiled in grueling, violent conditions while housed... Read More
Steven J. L. Taylor, “Exiles, Entrepreneurs, and Educators: African Americans in Ghana” (SUNY Press, 2019)
African Americans have a long history of emigration. In Exiles, Entrepreneurs, and Educators: African Americans in Ghana, Steven J. L. Taylor explores the second wave of African American exiles or repatriates to Ghana in post-1980s. Unlike the first wave of emigrants during the Kwame Nkrumah years (1957-1966), Taylor argues that... Read More
Michael Goldfield, “The Southern Key: Class, Race, and Radicalism in the 1930s and 1940s” (Oxford UP, 2020)
The golden key to understanding the last 75 years of American political development, the eminent labor relations scholar Michael Goldfield argues, lies in the contests between labor and capital in the American South during the 1930s and 1940s. Labor agitation and unionization efforts in the South in the New Deal... Read More