New Books Network

Gökçe Günel, “Spaceship in the Desert: Energy, Climate Change, and Urban Design in Abu Dhabi” (Duke UP, 2019)
Whether in space colonies or through geo-engineering, the looming disaster of climate change inspires no shortage of techno-utopian visions of human survival. Most of such hypotheses remain science fiction, but in Spaceship in the Desert: Energy, Climate Change, and Urban Design in Abu Dhabi (Duke University Press, 2019), Gökçe Günel... Read More
Dia Da Costa, “Politicizing Creative Economy: Activism and a Hunger Called Theater” (U Illinois Press, 2016)
In a world where heritage, culture, creativity, and the capacity to imagine are themselves commodified and sold under the banner of neoliberal freedom, (how) can art be harnessed for anti-capitalist agendas? At a time when scholars along all points of the political spectrum seem to agree that expressing their creativity... Read More
Kimberly Chong, “Best Practice: Management Consulting and the Ethics of Financialization in China” (Duke UP, 2018)
What do management consultants do, and how do they do it? These two deceptively simple questions are at the centre of Best Practice: Management Consulting and the Ethics of Financialization in China (Duke University Press, 2018), the new book by Kimberly Chong, a lecturer in anthropology at University College London.... Read More
Gregory Smits, “Maritime Ryukyu, 1050–1650” (U Hawaii Press, 2018)
Conventional portrayals of early Ryukyu are based on official histories written between 1650 and 1750. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, Gregory Smits makes extensive use of scholarship in archaeology and anthropology and leverages unconventional sources such as the Omoro sōshi (a collection of ancient songs) to present a fundamental rethinking of early... Read More
Rosalyn LaPier, “Invisible Reality: Storytellers, Storytakers, and the Supernatural World of the Blackfeet” (U Nebraska Press, 2017)
In Invisible Reality: Storytellers, Storytakers, and the Supernatural World of the Blackfeet (University of Nebraska Press, 2017), author Rosalyn LaPier, an associate professor in environmental studies at the University of Montana, complicates several narratives about Native people and the nonhuman world. Rather than “living in harmony with nature,” as stereotyped... Read More
Diane Tober, “Romancing the Sperm: Shifting Biopolitics and the Making of Modern Families” (Rutgers UP, 2019)
The development of a whole suite of new reproductive technologies in recent decades has contributed to broad cultural conversations and controversies over the meaning of family in the United States. In Romancing the Sperm: Shifting Biopolitics and the Making of Modern Families (Rutgers University Press, 2018), Diane Tober analyzes how... Read More