Native American Studies
Native American Studies November 24, 2020

We Do Not Want the Gates Closed Between Us

Native Networks and the Spread of the Ghost Dance

Justin Gage

Hosted by Annabel LaBrecque
Writing to U.S. President Grover Cleveland in 1888, Oglala Lakota leaders Little Wound, Young Man Afraid of His Horses, and Red Cloud insisted upon a simple yet significant demand to …

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Native American Studies November 20, 2020

Picturing Indians

Native Americans in Film, 1941-1960

Liza Black

Hosted by Annabel LaBrecque
Behind the braided wigs, buckskins, and excess bronzer that typified the mid-century "filmic Indian" lies a far richer, deeper history of Indigenous labor, survival, and agency. This history takes center …
History November 13, 2020

Ireland in the Virginian Sea

Colonialism in the British Atlantic

Audrey J. Horning

Hosted by Jonathan Megerian
In Ireland in the Virginian Sea: Colonialism in the British Atlantic (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), Audrey Horning revisits the fraught connections between Ireland and colonial Virginia. Both modern …
Popular Culture November 13, 2020

Graphic Indigeneity

Comics in the Americas and Australasia

Frederick Luis Aldama

Hosted by Rebekah Buchanan
In Graphic Indigeneity: Comics in the Americas and Australasia (UP of Mississippi, 2020), Frederick Luis Aldama brings together comics scholars Joshua T. Anderson, Chad A. Barbour, Susan Bernardin, Mike Borkent …
Latin American Studies November 9, 2020

Our Time is Now

Race and Modernity in Postcolonial Guatemala

Julie Gibbings

Hosted by Elena McGrath
Our Time is Now: Race and Modernity in Postcolonial Guatemala (Cambridge University Press, 2020) is an ambitious exploration of modernity, history, and time in post-colonial Guatemala. Set in the Q’eqchi …
American Studies November 4, 2020

Settling the Good Land

Governance and Promotion in John Winthrop’s New England

Agnès Delahaye

Hosted by Krzysztof Odyniec
Agnès Delahaye’s new book, Settling the Good Land: Governance and Promotion in John Winthrop’s New England (Brill, 2020), is the story of John Winthrop’s tenure as governor of the Massachusetts …
Latin American Studies October 16, 2020

Where Caciques and Mapmakers Met

Border Making in Eighteenth-Century South America

Jeffrey Alan Erbig Jr.

Hosted by Grant Kleiser
In his new book, Where Caciques and Mapmakers Met: Border Making in Eighteenth-Century South America (UNC Press, 2020), Dr. Jeffrey Erbig charts the interplay between imperial and indigenous spatial imaginaries …
European Studies October 12, 2020

Witness to the Age of Revolution

The Odyssey of Juan Bautista Tupac Amaru

Charles F. Walker

Hosted by Michael Vann
Charles F. Walker’s Witness to the Age of Revolution: The Odyssey of Juan Bautista Tupac Amaru, 2020, is part of Oxford University Press’ Graphic History Series, which takes serious archival …
American Studies October 2, 2020

Basket Diplomacy

Leadership, Alliance-Building, and Resilience among the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana, 1884-1984

Denise E. Bates

Hosted by David Dry
Before the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana became one of the state’s top private employers—with its vast landholdings and economic enterprises—they lived well below the poverty line and lacked any clear …
Latin American Studies October 1, 2020

The Invisible War

Indigenous Devotions, Discipline, and Dissent in Colonial Mexico

David Tavárez

Hosted by Krzysztof Odyniec
David Tavárez is a historian and linguistic anthropologist; he is Professor of Anthropology and Director of Latin American and Latino/a Studies at Vassar College. He is a specialist in Nahuatl …
American Studies September 30, 2020

The Destruction of the Bison

An Environmental History, 1750-1920

Andrew C. Isenberg

Hosted by Stephen Hausmann
In 1800, tens of millions of bison roamed the North American Great Plains. By 1900, fewer than 1,000 remained. In The Destruction of the Bison: An Environmental History, 1750-1920 (Cambridge …
African American Studies September 29, 2020

Taking Children

A History of American Terror

Laura Briggs

Hosted by Lisette Varon Carvajal
Laura Briggs’s Taking Children: A History of American Terror (University of California Press 2020) is a forceful and captivating book that readers won’t be able to put down, and that …
American Studies September 22, 2020

These People Have Always Been a Republic

Indigenous Electorates in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands, 1598–1912

Maurice S. Crandall

Hosted by David Dry
Spanning three hundred years and the colonial regimes of Spain, Mexico, and the United States, Maurice S. Crandall’s These People Have Always Been a Republic: Indigenous Electorates in the U.S.-Mexico …
Latin American Studies September 22, 2020

Transforming Indigenity

Urbanization and Language Revitalization in the Brazilian Amazon

Sarah Shulist

Hosted by Carrie Gillon
Transforming Indigenity: Urbanization and Language Revitalization in the Brazilian Amazon (University of Toronto Press) examines the role that language revitalization efforts play in cultural politics in the small city of …
Latin American Studies September 16, 2020

Managing Multiculturalism

Indigeneity and the Struggle for Rights in Colombia

Jean Jackson

Hosted by Lisette Varon Carvajal
In Managing Multiculturalism: Indigeneity and the Struggle for Rights in Colombia (Stanford University Press) Jean Jackson narrates her remarkable journey as an anthropologist in Colombia for over 50 years. This …
African American Studies September 11, 2020

Colorizing Restorative Justice

Voicing Our Realities

Edward C. Valandra

Hosted by Ashley Morales
Colorizing Restorative Justice: Voicing Our Realities (Living Justice Press, 2020) consists of stories that have arisen from the lived experiences of a broad range of seasoned, loving restorative justice practitioners …
American West September 11, 2020

A Bad Peace and A Good War

Spain and the Mescalero Apache Uprising of 1795-1799

Mark Santiago

Hosted by Stephen Hausmann
In August 1795, Apaches wiped out two Spanish patrols In the desert borderlands of the what is today the American Southwest and Mexican north. This attack ended what had bene …
American Studies August 19, 2020

Unfair Labor?

American Indians and the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago

David R. B. Beck

Hosted by Stephen Hausmann
The 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition was in many ways the crowning event of the nineteenth century United States. Held in Chicago, the metropolis of the West, and visited by tens …
American Studies August 18, 2020

Beneath the Backbone of the World

Blackfoot People and the North American Borderlands, 1720-1877

Ryan Hall

Hosted by Derek Litvak
Ryan Hall is the author of Beneath the Backbone of the World: Blackfoot People and the North American Borderlands, 1720-1877, published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2020 …
Latin American Studies August 6, 2020

Words and Worlds Turned Around

Indigenous Christianities in Colonial Latin America

David Tavárez

Hosted by Krzysztof Odyniec
Professor David Tavárez’s edited volume, Words & Worlds Turned Around: Indigenous Christianities in Colonial Latin America (University of Colorado Press, 2017), is a collection of eleven essays from historians and …