New Books Network

Jack Santino, “Public Performances: Studies in the Carnivalesque and Ritualesque” (UP Colorado, 2017)
Public Performances: Studies in the Carnivalesque and Ritualesque (University Press of Colorado) offers a deep and wide-ranging exploration of relationships among genres of public performance and of the underlying political motivations they share. Illustrating the connections among three themes—the political, the carnivalesque, and the ritualesque—the volume provides rich and comprehensive... Read More
David R. B. Beck, “Unfair Labor?: American Indians and the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago” (U Nebraska Press, 2019)
The 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition was in many ways the crowning event of the nineteenth century United States. Held in Chicago, the metropolis of the West, and visited by tens of millions of people from around the world, it showcased America’s past, present, and future. And Indigenous people were there... Read More
Jennifer Atkins, “New Orleans Carnival Balls: The Secret Side of Mardi Gras, 1870-1920” (LSU Press, 2017)
In New Orleans Carnival Balls: The Secret Side of Mardi Gras, 1870-1920 (LSU Press, 2017), Dr. Jennifer Atkins draws back the curtain on the origin of the exclusive Mardi Gras balls, bringing to light unique traditions unseen by outsiders. The oldest Carnival organizations emerged in the mid-nineteenth century and ruled... Read More
Ann Tucker, “Newest Born of Nations: European Nationalist Movements and the Making of the Confederacy” (UVA Press, 2020)
From the earliest stirrings of southern nationalism to the defeat of the Confederacy, analysis of European nationalist movements played a critical role in how southerners thought about their new southern nation. Southerners argued that because the Confederate nation was cast in the same mold as its European counterparts, it deserved... Read More
Teresa Bergman, “The Commemoration of Women in the United States” (Routledge, 2019)
On this episode of the New Books Network, Lee Pierce (s/t) interviews Teresa Bergman of the University of the Pacific on The Commemoration of Women in the United States: Remembering Women in Public Space (Routledge, 2019). Examining the public memorialization of women in the US over the past century, with a... Read More
Howard Philips Smith, “Southern Decadence in New Orleans” (LSU Press, 2018)
Almost a year ago, on my second interview for this podcast, I talked to Howard Philips Smith about Unveiling the Muse: The Lost History of Gay Carnival in New Orleans. I invited him back to tell us about his follow up book: Southern Decadence in New Orleans. Co-written with Frank... Read More
Daniel Q. Gillion, “The Loud Minority: Why Protests Matter in American Democracy” (Princeton UP, 2020)
Political Scientist Daniel Q. Gillion’s new book, The Loud Minority: Why Protests Matter in American Democracy (Princeton University Press, 2020) is an incredibly topical and important analysis of the connection between protests and the influence this public activism has on the voting electorate. Tracing the idea of the “silent majority” from... Read More
David J. Silverman, “This Land Is Their Land” (Bloomsbury, 2019)
What really happened at “the first Thanksgiving”? In This Land is Their Land: The Wampanoag Indians, Plymouth Colony, and the Troubled History of Thanksgiving (Bloomsbury, 2019), historian David J. Silverman reveals the complex history surrounding the 1621 feast that every November many Americans associate with silver-buckled Pilgrim costumes, Squanto and... Read More
Greta de Jong, “You Can’t Eat Freedom: Southerners and Social Justice after the Civil Rights Movement” (UNC Press, 2016)
Professor Greta de Jong of the University of Nevada, Reno, discusses her book, You Can’t Eat Freedom: Southerners and Social Justice after the Civil Rights Movement (University of North Carolina Press, 2016), about rural organizing, social justice movements, and the connected histories of the Civil Rights Movement and the War... Read More
William Elison, “The Neighborhood of Gods: The Sacred and the Visible at the Margins of Mumbai” (U Chicago Press, 2018)
William Elison‘s The Neighborhood of Gods: The Sacred and the Visible at the Margins of Mumbai (University of Chicago Press, 2018) explores how slum residents, tribal people, and members of other marginalized groups use religious icons to mark urban spaces in Mumbai. Interestingly, not all of Elison’s interview subjects identify... Read More