New Books Network

Frank Jacob, “Japanese War Crimes during World War II: Atrocity and the Psychology of Collective Violence” (Praeger, 2018)
When you mention Japanese War crimes in World War Two, you’ll often get different responses from different generations.  The oldest among us will talk about the Bataan Death March.  Younger people, coming of age in the 1990s, will mention the Rape of Nanking or the comfort women forced into service... Read More
Rhodri Jeffreys Jones, “The Nazi Spy Ring in America: Hitler’s Agents, the FBI and the Case that Stirred the Nation” (Georgetown UP, 2020)
In his new book, The Nazi Spy Ring in America: Hitler’s Agents, the FBI & the Case that Stirred the Nation (Georgetown University Press, 2020), Rhodri Jeffreys Jones tells the dramatic story of the Nazi spy ring in America. In the mid-1930s just as the United States was embarking on a policy... Read More
Chris Lombardi, “I Ain’t Marching Anymore: Dissenters, Deserters and Objectors to America’s Wars” (The New Press, 2020)
Before the U.S. Constitution had even been signed, soldiers and new veterans protested. Dissent, the hallowed expression of disagreement and refusal to comply with the government’s wishes, has a long history in the United States. Soldier dissenters, outraged by the country’s wars or egregious violations in conduct, speak out and... Read More
Jon Lindsay, “Information Technology and Military Power” (Cornell UP, 2020)
Many assume that information technology will one day clear away the “fog of war.” But as Jon Lindsay shows in Information Technology and Military Power (Cornell UP, 2020), the digitization of warfare can also increase confusion and misunderstanding. To understand why, it is important to understand the micro-foundations of military... Read More
Christopher Capozzola, “Bound By War: How the United States and the Philippines Built America’s First Pacific Century” (Basic Books, 2020)
Ever since American troops occupied the Philippines in 1898, generations of Filipinos have served in and alongside the U.S. armed forces. In Bound By War: How the United States and the Philippines Built America’s First Pacific Century (Basic Books, 2020), historian Christopher Capozzola reveals this forgotten history, showing how war... Read More
Brandon M. Schechter, “The Stuff of Soldiers: A History of the Red Army in World War II Through Objects” (Cornell UP, 2019)
The Stuff of Soldiers: A History of the Red Army in World War II Through Objects (Cornell University Press) uses everyday objects to tell the story of the Great Patriotic War as never before. Brandon Schechter attends to a diverse array of things―from spoons to tanks―to show how a wide... Read More
Stephen C. Kepher, “COSSAC: Lt. Gen. Sir Frederick Morgan and the Genesis of Operation OVERLORD” (Naval Institute Press, 2020)
D-Day, June 6, 1944, looms large in both popular and historical imaginations as the sin qua non, or single defining moment, of the Second World War. Though there were other d-days launched across multiple theaters throughout Europe, Africa, and the Pacific, only one endures as a potent symbol for the... Read More
Damien Lewis, “Churchill’s Hellraisers: The Secret Mission to Storm a Forbidden Nazi Fortress” (Citadel Press, 2020)
On the night of March 27, 1945, a small group of partisans and British soldiers from the elite Special Air Service (SAS) stormed two villas in northern Italy that were serving as the headquarters of the German 14th Army. In Churchill’s Hellraisers: The Secret Mission to Storm a Forbidden Nazi... Read More
Geoffrey Plank, “Atlantic Wars: From the Fifteenth Century to the Age of Revolution” (Oxford UP, 2020)
For the people of the Dawnland, they were floating islands. The sails resembled clouds, and the men gathered on deck looked like bears. When Europeans came ashore, whether Danes in what would become Newfoundland, English settlers in the land they named ‘Virginia’, their mastery of the oceans did not translate... Read More
Gregory A. Daddis, “Pulp Vietnam: War and Gender in Cold War Men’s Adventure Magazines” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
In his compelling evaluation of Cold War popular culture, Pulp Vietnam: War and Gender in Cold War Men’s Adventure Magazines (Cambridge UP, 2020), Gregory Daddis explores how men’s adventure magazines helped shape the attitudes of young, working-class Americans, the same men who fought and served in the long and bitter... Read More