New Books Network

Archie Brown, “The Human Factor: Gorbachev, Reagan, and Thatcher, and the End of the Cold War” (Oxford UP, 2020)
What brought about an end to the Cold War has long been a subject of speculation and mythology. One prominent argument is that the United States simply bankrupted the Soviet Union, outspending the Soviets on the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI, or “Star Wars”). Renowned Soviet and Russian scholar, Professor Archie... Read More
Mark Vincent, “Criminal Subculture in the Gulag” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2020)
Most Gulag scholarship focuses on political prisoners and, as a result, our knowledge of the camps as a lived experience remains relatively incomplete. Criminal Subculture in the Gulag: Prisoner Society in the Stalinist Labour Camps, 1924–53 (Bloomsbury Academic, 2020) draws on Gulag journals, song collections, tattoo drawings and dictionaries of... Read More
Laura A. Dean, “Diffusing Human Trafficking Policy in Eurasia” (Policy Press, 2020)
Laura A. Dean (Assistant Professor of Political Science at Millikin University and director of the Human Trafficking Research Lab) has spent many years investigating the urgent human rights issue of human trafficking in Eurasia. In her 2020 monograph Diffusing Human Trafficking Policy in Eurasia (Policy Press, 2020), Dr. Dean analyzes the... Read More
Catherine Belton, “Putin’s People: How the KGB Took Back Russia and Then Took on the West” (FSG, 2020)
The Russian state is back. That may not be a big surprise to Russia watchers. The degree to which it is a KGB state, however, is documented in great detail in Catherine Belton‘s new book Putin’s People: How the KGB Took Back Russia and Then Took on the West (Farrar, Straus and... Read More
Julia Obertreis, “Imperial Desert Dreams: Cotton Growing and Irrigation in Central Asia, 1860-1991” (V and R Unipress, 2017)
In Imperial Desert Dreams: Cotton Growing and Irrigation in Central Asia, 1860-1991 (V & R Unipress, 2017), Julia Obertreis explores the infrastructural, technical, and environmental aspects of the history of cotton agriculture and irrigation in Soviet Central Asia. Based on published sources and archival research conducted in Tashkent, Obertreis’ monograph... Read More
Paul D’Anieri, “Ukraine and Russia: From Civilized Divorce to Uncivil War” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Paul D’Anieri’s Ukraine and Russia: From Civilized Divorce to Uncivil War (Cambridge University Press, 2019) documents in a nuanced way the development of the current military conflict between Russia and Ukraine. The book includes a meticulous account of numerous developments which, according to D’Anieri, led to the war that still... Read More
Martina Cvajner, “Soviet Signoras: Personal and Collective Transformations in Eastern European Migration” (U Chicago, 2019)
Jana Byars talks with Martina Cvajner, Assistant Professor of Sociology in the Department of Psychology and Cognitive Sciences at the University of Trento, about her new book, Soviet Signoras: Personal and Collective Transformations in Eastern European Migration (University of Chicago Press, 2019). This book focuses on a group of women... Read More
Alexander Gendler, “Khurbm 1914-1922: Prelude to the Holocaust” (Varda Books, 2019)
The murder of two-thirds of European Jews, referred to by many as the Holocaust, did not begin June 22, 1941, with the German invasion of the Soviet Union, or September 1, 1939, with the beginning of WWII, or with 1938 Kristallnacht, or even with the 1933 rise of Hitler. According... Read More
Stanislav Kulchytsky, “The Famine of 1932-1933 in Ukraine: An Anatomy of the Holodomor” (CIUS Press, 2018)
Stanislav Kulchytsky’s The Famine of 1932-1933 in Ukraine: An Anatomy of the Holodomor (CIUS Press, 2018) presents a meticulous research that unveils the mechanism of the Holodomor as a man-made famine, which was launched in Ukraine by the Soviets as a punitive and controlling measure undertaken to discipline and suppress... Read More