New Books Network

Michael Kodas

Megafire

The Race to Extinguish a Deadly Epidemic of Flame

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2017

New Books in Environmental StudiesNew Books in Peoples & PlacesNew Books in ScienceNew Books in Science & TechnologyNew Books in Science, Technology, and SocietyNew Books in World AffairsNew Books Network August 23, 2019 Michael F. Robinson

In the 1980s, fires burned an average of two million acres per year. Today the average is eight million acres and growing. Scientists believe...

In the 1980s, fires burned an average of two million acres per year. Today the average is eight million acres and growing. Scientists believe that we could see years with twenty million acres burned, an area larger than country of Ireland. Today I talked to Michael Kodas about the phenomenon of megafires, forest fires that burn over 100,000 acres, and why the number of these fires is increasing every year.

Kodas is the deputy director of the Center for Environmental Journalism at the University of Colorado-Boulder. He is also an award winning photojournalist and reporter. His book Megafire: The Race to Extinguish a Deadly Epidemic of Flame (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2017) recently won the Colorado Book Award.


Michael F. Robinson is professor of history at Hillyer College, University of Hartford. He’s the author of The Coldest Crucible: Arctic Exploration and American Culture (University of Chicago Press, 2006) and The Lost White Tribe: Scientists, Explorers, and the Theory that Changed a Continent (Oxford University Press, 2016). He’s also the host of the podcast Time to Eat the Dogs, a weekly podcast about science, history, and exploration.