New Books Network

S. Ingram, W. G. Mullins, and T. Richardson, “Implied Nowhere: Absence in Folklore Studies” (UP of Mississippi, 2019)
In Implied Nowhere: Absence in Folklore Studies (University Press of Mississippi, 2019) authors Shelley Ingram, Willow G. Mullins, and Todd Richardson talk about things folklorists don’t usually talk about. They ponder the tacit aspects of folklore and folklore studies, looking into the unarticulated expectations placed upon people whenever they talk... Read More
M. D. Foster and J. A. Tolbert, “The Folkloresque: Reframing Folklore in a Popular Culture World” (Utah State UP, 2015)
This volume introduces a new concept to explore the dynamic relationship between folklore and popular culture: the “folkloresque.” With “folkloresque,” Foster and Tolbert name the product created when popular culture appropriates or reinvents folkloric themes, characters, and images. Such manufactured tropes are traditionally considered outside the purview of academic folklore... Read More
Emily Wilcox, “Revolutionary Bodies: Chinese Dance and the Socialist Legacy” (U California Press, 2019)
What is “Chinese dance,” how did it take shape in during China’s socialist period, and how has this socialist form continued to influence Post-Mao expressive cultures in the People’s Republic of China? These are the questions that Emily Wilcox, Assistant Professor of Modern Chinese Studies in the Department of Asian... Read More
Anway Mukhopadhyay, “The Goddess in Hindu-Tantric Traditions: Devī as Corpse” (Routledge, 2018)
Why is the Indian Goddess sometimes figured as a corpse in Tantric Traditions? What is the significance of this? How is it different from when the Hindu god Shiva is figured as a corpse? Centered on the myth of Sati (whereby the Goddess was dismembered after her self-immolation), Anway Mukhopadhyay‘s... Read More
Fernando Orejuela and Stephanie Shonekan, “Black Lives Matter and Music: Protest, Intervention, Reflection” (Indiana UP, 2018)
Music has always been integral to the Black Lives Matter movement in the United States, with songs such as Kendrick Lamar’s “Alright,” J. Cole’s “Be Free,” D’Angelo and the Vanguard’s “The Charade,” The Game’s “Don’t Shoot,” Janelle Monae’s “Hell You Talmbout,” Usher’s “Chains,” and many others serving as unofficial anthems... Read More
Susan Lepselter, “The Resonance of Unseen Things: Poetics, Power, Captivity, and UFOs in the American Uncanny” (U Michigan Press, 2016)
When we talk about stories of alien abduction in the United States, we often do so through a framework of belief vs. disbelief. Do I think this story is true, or do I think it’s false? Anthropologist Susan Lepselter asks what happens when we instead listen to “UFO talk” ethnographically, understanding it... Read More
Anand Prahlad, “The Secret Life of a Black Aspie: A Memoir” (U Alaska Press, 2017)
Anand Prahlad was born on a former plantation in Virginia in 1954. This memoir, vividly internal, powerfully lyric, and brilliantly impressionistic, is his story. For the first four years of his life, Prahlad didn’t speak. But his silence didn’t stop him from communicating—or communing—with the strange, numinous world he found... Read More