New Books Network

Edgardo Pérez Morales, “No Limits to Their Sway: Cartagena’s Privateers and the Masterless Caribbean in the Age of Revolutions” (Vanderbilt UP, 2018)
In No Limits to Their Sway: Cartagena’s Privateers and the Masterless Caribbean in the Age of Revolutions (Vanderbilt University Press, 2018), Edgardo Pérez Morales investigates the hemispheric connections between the Spanish American colony of New Granada (or Colombia) and the greater Caribbean in the wake of the Haitian Revolution. Residents... Read More
Roundtable Discussion of Jennifer Morgan’s “Laboring Women: Reproduction and Gender in New World Slavery” (UPenn Press, 2004)
Welcome to New Books in African American Studies, a channel on the New Books Network. I am your host Adam McNeil. Today is part 2 of my discussion about Dr. Jennifer L. Morgan’s 2004 Laboring Women: Reproduction and Gender in New World Slavery. Instead of Dr. Morgan, who was featured... Read More
Jennifer L. Morgan, “Laboring Women: Reproduction and Gender in New World Slavery” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2004)
In 2004, Dr. Jennifer L. Morgan’s Laboring Women: Reproduction and Gender in New World Slavery (University of Pennsylvania Press) was published. Sixteen years later, Morgan’s Laboring Women stands tall as one of the most important historical texts in the history of the academy. Building on Dr. Deborah Gray White’s literal... Read More
Brad Walters, “The Greening of Saint Lucia: Economic Development and Environmental Change in the West Indies” (UWI Press, 2019)
Saint Lucia’s rural landscape is more forested today than at any time in at least seventy-five years (probably much longer). This change is profoundly significant given widespread efforts to achieve sustainable development on small-island states like Saint Lucia. Yet, this seemingly good-news story runs contrary to most conventional narratives about... Read More
Simon Hall, “Ten Days in Harlem: Fidel Castro and the Making of the 1960s” (Faber and Faber, 2020)
In his new book Ten Days in Harlem: Fidel Castro and the Making of the 1960s (Faber, 2020), Simon Hall, a Professor of Modern History at the University of Leeds, colorfully details an extraordinary visit by Fidel Castro to New York in the Autumn of 1960 for the opening of the UN General... Read More
Jessica Marie Johnson, “Wicked Flesh: Black Women, Intimacy, and Freedom in the Atlantic World” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020)
The story of freedom and all of its ambiguities begins with intimate acts steeped in power. It is shaped by the peculiar oppressions faced by African women and women of African descent. And it pivots on the self-conscious choices black women made to retain control over their bodies and selves,... Read More
Lou Hernandez, “Bobby Maduro and the Cuban Sugar Kings” (McFarland, 2019)
There are two key elements of today’s professional baseball that are informed by Lou Hernandez’s wonderful book Bobby Maduro and the Cuban Sugar Kings (McFarland, 2019): the increased presence of Latinos both on the field and off in MLB, and the interest of MLB to promote its game internationally, particularly... Read More
F. Henry and D. Plaza, “Carnival Is Woman: Feminism and Performance in Caribbean Mas” (UP of Mississippi, 2019)
Through a feminist perspective, Carnival Is Woman: Feminism and Performance in Caribbean Mas (University Press of Mississippi, 2019) examines the presence of women in contemporary Carnival by demonstrating not only their strength in numbers, but also the ways in which they participate in the festivities. Exploring different themes, the authors... Read More
Amelia Moore, “Destination Anthropocene: Science and Tourism in The Bahamas” (U California Press, 2019)
Despite being a minor contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions, like many other small island nations, The Bahamas’s ecology and society are especially vulnerable to current and expected changes to the oceans and the climate. Spectacular coral reefs, low-lying islands, and a social life oriented towards the sea makes The... Read More
Annette Joseph-Gabriel, “Reimagining Liberation: How Black Women Transformed Citizenship in the French Empire” (Illinois UP, 2020)
‘Where were the women?’ was the big question that led Annette Joseph-Gabriel to her new book, Reimagining Liberation: How Black Women Transformed Citizenship in the French Empire (University of Illinois Press, 2020). This ‘where’ ended up meaning different things as she tracked the lives, ideas, and roles played by Black... Read More