New Books Network

Stijn Vanheule, Derek Hook and Calum Neill, “Reading Lacan’s Écrits” (Routledge, 2018)
Lacan published his Écrits in 1966, a compilation of his written work up to that middle period in his teaching. Notoriously difficult to read, the editors of the book we’re discussing today describe the Écrits as “an unwieldy, conglomerate ‘urtext’ … not a book at all … but ‘the waste’... Read More
Donald Reid, “Opening the Gates: The Lip Affair, 1968-1981” (Verso Books, 2018)
In the summer of 1973, Donald Reid was an undergraduate student who had traveled to France for the first time to work on his Honors thesis in History. It was the “summer of Lip”. Don’s new book, Opening the Gates: The Lip Affair, 1968-1981 (Verso Books, 2018) revisits the years... Read More
Joan Wallach Scott, “Sex and Secularism” (Princeton UP, 2017)
Joan Wallach Scott’s contributions to the history of women and gender, and to feminist theory, will be familiar to listeners across multiple disciplines. Her latest book, Sex and Secularism (Princeton University Press, 2017) is a compelling analysis of the discourse of secularism in the modern democratic (imperial) nation-states of “the West”.... Read More
David Green, “The Hundred Years War: A People’s History” (Yale UP, 2014)
The year 1453 marked the end of an intermittent yet seemingly endless series of wars between the Kingdom of France and the Kingdom of England that, some four hundred years later, was dubbed the Hundred Years War. Depending on how you count even the most conservative estimate of its beginnings... Read More
Stacy Fahrenthold, “Between the Ottomans and the Entente: The First World War in the Syrian and Lebanese Diaspora, 1908-1925” (Oxford UP, 2019)
In her debut book, Between the Ottomans and the Entente: The First World War in the Syrian and Lebanese Diaspora, 1908-1925 (Oxford University Press, 2019), Stacy Fahrenthold sheds a timely light on Syrian and Lebanese immigrants who established vibrant diaspora communities in the Americas during the late 19th and early... Read More
Thomas Dodman, “What Nostalgia Was: War, Empire, and the Time of a Deadly Emotion” (U Chicago Press, 2018)
Feelings have a history and nostalgia has its own. In What Nostalgia Was: War, Empire, and the Time of a Deadly Emotion (University of Chicago Press, 2018) Thomas Dodman explores the history of nostalgia from the late seventeenth to the late nineteenth century. Beginning with the coining of the term... Read More
Marixa Lasso, “Erased: The Untold Story of the Panama Canal” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Many of our presumptions about the Panama Canal Zone are wrong; it was not carved out of uninhabited jungle, the creation of Lake Gatún did not flood towns and force them to move, people living in the zone prior to the construction of the canal were not out of step... Read More