New Books Network

Annette Joseph-Gabriel, “Reimagining Liberation: How Black Women Transformed Citizenship in the French Empire” (Illinois UP, 2020)
‘Where were the women?’ was the big question that led Annette Joseph-Gabriel to her new book, Reimagining Liberation: How Black Women Transformed Citizenship in the French Empire (University of Illinois Press, 2020). This ‘where’ ended up meaning different things as she tracked the lives, ideas, and roles played by Black... Read More
Patrice Gueniffey, “Napoleon and de Gaulle: Heroes and History” (Harvard UP, 2020)
One of France’s most famous historians compares and contrasts the two most famous French exemplars of political and military leadership of the past two-hundred and fifty years to make the case that individuals, for better and worse, matter in history. Historians have tried to teach us that the historical past... Read More
Greg Beckett, “There is No More Haiti: Between Life and Death in Port-au-Prince” (U California Press, 2019)
In today’s episode, I talk with Dr. Greg Beckett, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Western University, about his richly grounded book There is No More Haiti: Between Life and Death in Port-au-Prince (2019, University of California Press – and it is coming out in a paperback edition this November). This... Read More
Linda Goddard, “Savage Tales: The Writings of Paul Gauguin” (Yale UP, 2019)
In Savage Tales: The Writings of Paul Gauguin (Yale University Press, 2019), Linda Goddard investigates the role that Paul Gauguin’s writings played in his artistic practice and in his negotiation of his colonial identity. As a French artist who lived in Polynesia, Gauguin occupies a crucial position in histories of... Read More
Sophie White, “Voices of the Enslaved: Love, Labor, and Longing in French Louisiana” (UNC Press, 2019)
In her prize-winning study Voices of the Enslaved: Love, Labor, and Longing in French Colonial Louisiana (Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press, 2019), award-winning historian Sophie White (Professor of American Studies, Africana Studies, History, and Gender Studies, and Fellow of the Nanovic... Read More
Laurie M. Wood, “Archipelago of Justice: Law in France’s Early Modern Empire” (Yale UP, 2020)
Historians have long treated the Atlantic and Indian Ocean routes of early modern French empire separately. But, early modern people understood France as a bi-oceanic empire, connected by vast but strong pathways of commercial, intellectual, and legal exchange. Laurie M. Wood’s Archipelago of Justice: Law in France’s Early Modern Empire... Read More
Richard Carswell, “The Fall of France in the Second World War: History and Memory” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019)
This fascinating book by Richard Carswell looks at how the fall of France in the Second World War has been recorded by historians and remembered within French society. The Fall of France in the Second World War: History and Memory (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019) argues that explanations of the ‘debacle’ have... Read More
Kevin Duong, “The Virtues of Violence: Democracy Against Disintegration in Modern France” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Kevin Duong, a political theorist in the Politics Department at the University of Virginia, has written a fascinating analysis of the way that violence has been used, in a sense, to create or promote solidarity during the course of the “long nineteenth century” in France.  Duong explores four separate periods... Read More
Kory E. Olson, “The Cartographic Capital: Mapping Third Republic Paris” (Liverpool UP, 2018)
When is the last time you looked at/consulted a paper map? Perhaps you have one hanging on a wall at home or work, framed or not. Or maybe you have some old road maps in a stack somewhere, as I do, sitting untouched since various digital forms have made printed... Read More