New Books Network

Roman Deininger, “Markus Söder: The Shadow Chancellor” (Droemer Knauer, 2020)
Next year, Germany goes to the polls. For the first time in 15 years, Angela Merkel will not be a candidate for chancellor. Although a leadership election is underway inside Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union, all eyes are on the CDU’s Bavarian sister party and its leader Markus Söder as her... Read More
Justin Q. Olmstead, “The United States’ Entry into the First World War: The Role of British and German Diplomacy” (Boydell Press, 2019)
The complicated situation which led to the American entry into the First World War in 1917 is often explained from the perspective of public opinion, US domestic politics, or financial and economic opportunity. In this new book, The United States’ Entry into the First World War: The Role of British and... Read More
Julia Sneeringer, “A Social History of Early Rock ‘n’ Roll in Germany: Hamburg from Burlesque to The Beatles, 1956-69” (Bloomsbury, 2018)
The Beatles’ sojourn in the St. Pauli district of Hamburg during the early 1960s is part of music legend. As Julia Sneeringer reveals in A Social History of Early Rock ‘n’ Roll in Germany: Hamburg from Burlesque to The Beatles, 1956-69 (Bloomsbury, 2018), though, this was just the most famous... Read More
Despina Stratigakos, “Hitler’s Northern Utopia: Building the New Order in Occupied Norway” (Princeton UP, 2020)
In her new book Hitler’s Northern Utopia: Building the New Order in Occupied Norway (Princeton University Press, 2020), Despina Stratigakos investigates the Nazi occupation of Norway. Between 1940 and 1945, German occupiers transformed Norway into a vast construction zone. This remarkable building campaign, largely unknown today, was designed to extend the... Read More
T. P. Kaplan and W. Gruner, “Resisting Persecution: Jews and Their Petitions during the Holocaust” (Berghahn, 2020)
In 20 years of studying the Holocaust, it didn’t occur to me that German officials might, when petitioned by German Jews or by Germans advocating for German Jews, change their minds.  But it turns out that, sometimes, they did. And even when they didn’t, petitioning local, regional or national officials... Read More
Helmut Walser Smith, “Germany: A Nation in its Time” (Liveright, 2020)
In his groundbreaking 500-year history entitled Germany: A Nation in its Time (Liveright, 2020), Helmut Walser Smith challenges traditional perceptions of Germany’s conflicted past, revealing a nation far more thematically complicated than many twentieth-century historians have imagined. Smith’s dramatic narrative begins with the earliest glimmers of a nation in the 1500s,... Read More
Victoria de Grazia, “The Perfect Fascist: A Story of Love, Power, and Morality in Mussolini’s Italy” (Harvard UP, 2020)
In her new book, The Perfect Fascist: A Story of Love, Power, and Morality in Mussolini’s Italy (Belknap Press), Dr. Victoria de Grazia takes the story of Attilio Teruzzi and explores the social history of fascism. When Attilio Teruzzi, Mussolini’s handsome political enforcer, married a rising young American opera star, his... Read More
Molly Loberg, “The Struggle for the Streets of Berlin: Politics, Consumption, and Urban Space, 1914-1945” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Who owns the street? This is the question that animates The Struggle for the Streets of Berlin: Politics, Consumption, and Urban Space, 1914-1945 (Cambridge University Press) by Molly Loberg. Interwar Berliners faced this question with great hope yet devastating consequences. In Germany, the First World War and 1918 Revolution transformed... Read More
Marion Kaplan, “Hitler’s Jewish Refugees: Hope and Anxiety in Portugal” (Yale UP, 2020)
Marion Kaplan’s riveting book,  Hitler’s Jewish Refugees: Hope and Anxiety in Portugal (Yale University Press) describes the dramatic experiences of Jewish refugees as they fled Hitler’s regime and then lived in limbo in Portugal until they could reach safer havens abroad. Drawing attention not only to the social and physical... Read More
Richard Breitman, “The Journal of Holocaust and Genocide Studies”(Oxford Academic/USHMM)
The Journal of Holocaust and Genocide Studies is turning twenty-five.  One of the first academic journals focused on the study of the Holocaust and Genocide Studies, it has been one of a few journals that led the field in new directions. So it seemed appropriate to mark the moment by talking with... Read More