New Books Network

Marco Rafalà, “How Fires End” (Little A, 2019)
In a sad but loving tribute to his Sicilian-Italian heritage, Marco Rafala’s debut novel How Fires End (Little A, 2019) centers on the haunting legacy of WWII on the people of a small Sicilian village. It’s the summer of 1943 and an unexploded mortar shell kills 9-year-old Salvatore’s twin brothers.... Read More
Eric Dursteler, “In the Sultan’s Realm: Two Venetian Reports on the Early Modern Ottoman Empire” (CRRS, 2018)
In the Sultan’s Realm: Two Venetian Reports on the Early Modern Ottoman Empire (Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2018) is Professor Eric Dursteler’s translation of two final diplomatic reports (relazione) that Venetian ambassadors delivered upon their return to that Most Serene Republic at the turn of the seventeenth century—Lorenzo... Read More
Maddalena Marinari, “Unwanted: Italian and Jewish Mobilization against Restrictive Immigration Laws, 1882–1965” (UNC Press, 2020)
In the late nineteenth century, Italians and Eastern European Jews joined millions of migrants around the globe who left their countries to take advantage of the demand for unskilled labor in rapidly industrializing nations, including the United States. Many Americans of northern and western European ancestry regarded these newcomers as... Read More
Maurice Finocchiaro, “On Trial for Reason: Science, Religion, and Culture in the Galileo Affair” (Oxford UP, 2019)
In his new book On Trial for Reason: Science, Religion, and Culture in the Galileo Affair (Oxford University Press, 2019), Maurice Finocchiaro shows that there were (and are) really two Galileo “affairs.” Galileo’s original trial and condemnation forms the first affair, the cultural history of controversies about the meaning of... Read More
Áine O’Healy, “Migrant Anxieties: Italian Cinema in a Transnational Frame” (Indiana UP, 2019)
In her recently published Migrant Anxieties: Italian Cinema in a Transnational Frame (Indiana University Press, 2019), Áine O’Healy explores how filmmakers in Italy have probed the tensions accompanying the country’s shift from an emigrant nation to a destination point for over five million immigrants over the course of three decades.... Read More
Karima Moyer-Nocchi, “The Eternal Table: A Cultural History of Food in Rome” (Rowman and Littlefield, 2019)
Karima Moyer-Nocchi is a professor of modern languages at the University of Siena and a lecturer for the Master in Culinary Studies program at the University of Rome, Tor Vergata. Her first book, Chewing the Fat – An Oral History of Italian Food from Fascism to Dolce Vita (Medea, 2015)... Read More
Justin Nystrom, “Creole Italian: Sicilian Immigrants and the Shaping of New Orleans Food Culture” (U Georgia Press, 2018)
In this this interview, Carrie Tippen talks with Justin Nystrom about his latest book, Creole Italian: Sicilian Immigrants and the Shaping of New Orleans Food Culture, published in 2018 by the University of Georgia Press as part of the Southern Foodways Alliance series Studies in Culture, People, and Place. The... Read More
Robin Pickering-Iazzi, “Dead Silent: Life Stories of Girls and Women Killed by the Italian Mafias, 1878-2018” (U Wisconsin, Milwaukee, 2019)
Robin Pickering-Iazzi’s Dead Silent: Life Stories of Girls and Women Killed by the Italian Mafias, 1878-2018 is the first history of its kind in English. An open access ebook, this study literally “unburies” the identities of over two-hundred girls and women who lived in Italy between 1878 and 2018, and... Read More