New Books Network

Stefan Bauer, “The Invention of Papal History: Onofrio Panvinio between Renaissance and Catholic Reform” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Stefan Bauer has written an outstanding study of one of the most important Catholic historians in early modern Europe. Bauer, who has just taken up a new position teaching history at Warwick University, UK, has spent much of the last decade working on the life and work of Onofrio Panvinio.... Read More
Giorgio Bertellini, “The Divo and the Duce: Promoting Film Stardom and the Political Leadership in 1920s America” (U California Press, 2019)
In 1927, the Hollywood stars (and spouses), Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr stood outside their California home, arms raised in fascist salute. The photo’s caption, referencing the couple’s trip to Rome the previous year, informs fans that the couple “greet guests at their beach camp in true Italian style.”... Read More
Tamar Herzig, “A Convert’s Tale: Art, Crime, and Jewish Apostasy in Renaissance Italy” (Harvard UP, 2019)
On this episode of New Books in History, Jana Byars talks with Tamar Herzig, Professor of History at Tel Aviv University, the Director of Tel Aviv University’s Morris E Curiel Institute for European Studies, and as the Vice Chairperson of the Historical Society of Israel about her new book, A... Read More
Jeremy Black, “A Brief History of the Mediterranean” (Little Brown, 2020)
Jeremy Black, the prolific professor of history at Exeter University, has published A Brief History of the Mediterranean (Little Brown, 2020), to offer readers an overview of this sphere from pre-history to the present day. Taking in the importance of geography, civilizational change and cultural representations, Black moves between disciplines... Read More
Victoria de Grazia, “The Perfect Fascist: A Story of Love, Power, and Morality in Mussolini’s Italy” (Harvard UP, 2020)
In her new book, The Perfect Fascist: A Story of Love, Power, and Morality in Mussolini’s Italy (Belknap Press), Dr. Victoria de Grazia takes the story of Attilio Teruzzi and explores the social history of fascism. When Attilio Teruzzi, Mussolini’s handsome political enforcer, married a rising young American opera star, his... Read More
Dana Renga, “Watching Sympathetic Perpetrators on Italian Television: Gomorrah and Beyond” (Palgrave MacMillan, 20
In Watching Sympathetic Perpetrators on Italian Television: Gomorrah and Beyond (Palgrave MacMillan, 2019), Dana Renga offers the first comprehensive study of recent, popular Italian television. Building on work in American television studies, audience and reception theory, and masculinity studies, her book examines how and why viewers are positioned to engage... Read More
Guy Raffa, “Dante’s Bones: How a Poet Invented Italy” (Harvard UP, 2020)
On this episode of New Books in History, Jana Byars talks with Guy Raffa, Associate Professor of Italian Studies at UT Austin, about his new book, Dante’s Bones: How a Poet Invented Italy (Harvard University Press, 2020). Dante’s Bones is an academic mystery story, the “graveyard history” of Dante Alighieri,... Read More
Colin Rose, “A Renaissance of Violence: Homicide in Early Modern Italy” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
On this episode of New Books in History, Jana Byars talks with Colin Rose, Assistant Professor of History at Brock University in St. Catherine’s, Ontario, Canada, about his new book, A Renaissance of Violence: Homicide in Early Modern Italy (Cambridge University Press, 2019). Seventeenth-century Bologna saw a severe uptick of... Read More
Russell J. A. Kilbourn, “The Cinema of Paolo Sorrentino: Commitment to Style” (Wallflower Press, 2020)
Russell J. A. Kilbourn’s The Cinema of Paolo Sorrentino: Commitment to Style (Wallflower Press, 2020) is the first comprehensive study published in the English-speaking world on one of the most compelling figures in twenty-first century European film, Italian 2014 Academy Award recipient Paolo Sorrentino. Kilbourn’s book offers close readings of... Read More
James Renshaw, “In Search of the Romans” (Bloomsbury, 2019)
James Renshaw modestly describes his interactive textbook, In Search of the Romans (Bloomsbury, 2019) as an attempt to bring his high school readers to a “base camp on Mount Everest and then hand them off to the Sherpas.” Renshaw explains that the “Sherpas” are historians who delve into a particular... Read More