New Books Network

Madina Tlostanova, “What Does it Mean to be Post-Soviet? Decolonial Art from the Ruins of the Soviet Empire” (Duke UP, 2018)
In What Does it Mean to be Post-Soviet? Decolonial Art from the Ruins of the Soviet Empire (Duke University Press, 2018), Madina Tlostanova traces how contemporary post-Soviet art mediates this human condition. Observing how the concept of the happy future—which was at the core of the project of Soviet modernity—has... Read More
Sonya Bilocerkowycz, “On Our Way Home from the Revolution: Reflections on Ukraine” (Mad Creek Books, 2019)
It’s been a difficult year in America. From plague, to protests, to politics, there have never been so many lives at stake, nor so many questions about the future of our country. Since his election in 2016, questions have been raised about president Trump’s too-close-for-comfort ties to Russian leadership and... Read More
Nathan Spannaus, “Preserving Islamic Tradition: Abu Nasr Qursawi and the Beginnings of Modern Reformism” (Oxford UP, 2019)
What were some of the major transformations taking place for Muslim communities in the Russian Empire of the eighteenth century? How did the introduction of a state-backed structure for Muslim religious institutions alter Islamic religious authority in the empire? And who exactly was Abu Nasr Qursawi and what was his... Read More
Iraj Bashiri, “The History of the Civil War in Tajikistan” (Academic Studies Press, 2020)
In The History of the Civil War in Tajikistan (Academic Studies Press, 2020) Iraj Bashiri provides an overview of the Civil War in Tajikistan that emerged amidst the collapse of the Soviet Union. Based on personal observations, interviews, and a variety of primary and secondary publications, Bashiri places the conflict... Read More
Diana T. Kudaibergenova, “Toward Nationalizing Regimes: Conceptualizing Power and Identity in the Post-Soviet Realm” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2020)
The collapse of the Soviet Union famously opened new venues for the theories of nationalism and the study of processes and actors involved in these new nation-building processes. In Toward Nationalizing Regimes: Conceptualizing Power and Identity in the Post-Soviet Realm (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2020), Diana T. Kudaibergenova takes the... Read More
Gregory Afinogenov, “Spies and Scholars: Chinese Secrets and Imperial Russia’s Quest for World Power” (Harvard UP, 2020)
The ways in which states and empires spy on and study one another has changed a great deal over time in line with shifting political priorities, written traditions and technologies. Even on this highly diverse global background, however, the long process of licit and illicit familiarization between Russia and China... Read More
Scott Levi, “The Bukharan Crisis: A Connected History of 18th-Century Central Asia” (U Pittsburgh, 2020)
In his new book, The Bukharan Crisis: A Connected History of 18th-Century Central Asia (University of Pittsburgh, 2020), Scott Levi brings new perspectives into the historiography of early Modern Central Asia. Levi reflects on recent scholarship to identify multiple causal factors that contributed to the Bukharan crisis of the 18th... Read More
Francine Hirsch, “Soviet Judgment at Nuremberg” (Oxford UP, 2020)
How did an authoritarian regime help lay the cornerstones of human rights and international law? Soviet Judgment at Nuremberg: A New History of the International Military Tribunal after World War II  (Oxford University Press, 2020) argues that Anglo-American dominated histories capture the moment while missing the story. Drawing upon secret... Read More
David Shimer, “Rigged: America, Russia, and One Hundred Years of Covert Electoral Interference” (Knopf, 2020)
“The guard is tired.” With that simple phrase, the newly installed Bolshevik regime in Russia dismissed the duly elected Constituent Assembly in January 1918. And, one might say, so started Russia’s century-long interference in elections and electoral outcomes. In his new book Rigged: America, Russia, and One Hundred Years of... Read More