New Books Network

Sabine Hildebrandt, “The Anatomy of Murder: Ethical Transgressions and Anatomical Science during the Third Reich” (Berghahn, 2017)
Of the many medical specializations to transform themselves during the rise of National Socialism, anatomy has received relatively little attention from historians. While politics and racial laws drove many anatomists from the profession, most who remained joined the Nazi party, and some helped to develop the scientific basis for its... Read More
Francine Hirsch, “Soviet Judgment at Nuremberg” (Oxford UP, 2020)
How did an authoritarian regime help lay the cornerstones of human rights and international law? Soviet Judgment at Nuremberg: A New History of the International Military Tribunal after World War II  (Oxford University Press, 2020) argues that Anglo-American dominated histories capture the moment while missing the story. Drawing upon secret... Read More
Stephan Talty, “The Good Assassin” (HMH, 2020)
History that reads like a thriller; The Good Assassin: How A Mossad Agent and a Band of Survivors Hunted Down The Butcher of Latvia (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2020) by Stephan Talty is the untold story of an Israeli spy’s epic journey to bring the notorious Butcher of Latvia to justice—a... Read More
Adam Brown, “Judging ‘Privileged’ Jews: Holocaust Ethics, Representation, and the ‘Grey Zone'” (Berghahn, 2015)
The Nazis’ persecution of the Jews during the Holocaust included the creation of prisoner hierarchies that forced victims to cooperate with their persecutors. Many in the camps and ghettos came to hold so-called “privileged” positions, and their behavior has often been judged as self-serving and harmful to fellow inmates. Such... Read More
Vincent Bevins, “The Jakarta Method” (Public Affairs, 2020)
Why did the word “Jakarta” appear as graffiti on the streets of Santiago in 1973? Why did left-wing Chilean activists receive postcards in the mail with the ominous message “Jakarta is coming”? Why did a Brazilian general lose his temper in an interview with university students, threaten their safety, and... Read More
John Roosa, “Buried Histories: The Anticommunist Massacres of 1965-1966 in Indonesia” (U Wisconsin Press, 2020)
On the night of September 30/October 1, 1965, a bungled coup d’état resulted in the deaths of a handful of Indonesian generals and a young girl. Within days the Indonesian army claimed that the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI), the largest communist party outside of the Soviet Union and the People’s... Read More
David Slucki et al., “Laughter After: Humor and the Holocaust” (Wayne State UP, 2020)
In Laughter After: Humor and the Holocaust  (Wayne State University Press, 2020), Co-editors David Slucki,  Loti Smorgon Associate Professor of Contemporary Jewish Life and Culture at the Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation at Monash University, Gabriel N. Finder, professor in the department of German Languages and Literatures and former director of the... Read More
Gabriel Finder, “Justice behind the Iron Curtain: Nazis on Trial in Communist Poland” (U Toronto Press, 2018)
When Americans think about trials of Holocaust perpetrators, they generally think of the Nuremberg Trials or the trial of Adolf Eichmann or perhaps of the Frankfort trials of perpetrators from Auschwitz. If they think of Polish trials at all, they likely assume these were show trials driven by political goals rather... Read More
John K. Roth, “Sources of Holocaust Insight: Learning and Teaching about the Genocide” (Cascade Books, 2020)
At Newman I co-teach a class titled “The Holocaust and its Legacies.”  I teach the course with a Professor of Theology and it’s designed to help students understand the ways in which the Holocaust shaped the world they live in. It is, in a sense, designed to help students gain... Read More