New Books Network

William L. Patterson, “We Charge Genocide: The Crime of Government Against the Negro People” (International Publishers, 2017)
In 2017, We Charge Genocide: The Crime of Government Against the Negro People, the historic petition authored by William L. Patterson, was published in its third edition. It has been nearly 70 years since Patterson, who passed away in 1980, and Paul Roberson, who passed away in 1976, presented the... Read More
David Livingstone Smith, “On Inhumanity: Dehumanization and How to Resist It” (Oxford UP, 2020)
The Rwandan genocide, the Holocaust, the lynching of African Americans, the colonial slave trade: these are horrific episodes of mass violence spawned from racism and hatred. We like to think that we could never see such evils again–that we would stand up and fight. But something deep in the human... Read More
T. P. Kaplan and W. Gruner, “Resisting Persecution: Jews and Their Petitions during the Holocaust” (Berghahn, 2020)
In 20 years of studying the Holocaust, it didn’t occur to me that German officials might, when petitioned by German Jews or by Germans advocating for German Jews, change their minds.  But it turns out that, sometimes, they did. And even when they didn’t, petitioning local, regional or national officials... Read More
Carolyn J. Dean, “The Moral Witness: Trials and Testimony after Genocide” (Cornell UP, 2019)
The Moral Witness: Trials and Testimony after Genocide (Cornell University Press, 2019) is the first cultural history of the “witness to genocide” in the West. Carolyn J. Dean shows how the witness became a protagonist of twentieth-century moral culture by tracing the emergence of this figure in courtroom battles from... Read More
Rafael Medoff, “The Jews Should Keep Quiet: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, and the Holocaust” (JPS, 2019)
Like so many Americans, American Jews supported President Roosevelt. They adored him. They believed in him. They idolized him. Perhaps they shouldn’t have. Based on recently discovered documents, The Jews Should Keep Quiet: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, and the Holocaust (Jewish Publication Society) reassesses the hows and... Read More
Marion Kaplan, “Hitler’s Jewish Refugees: Hope and Anxiety in Portugal” (Yale UP, 2020)
Marion Kaplan’s riveting book,  Hitler’s Jewish Refugees: Hope and Anxiety in Portugal (Yale University Press) describes the dramatic experiences of Jewish refugees as they fled Hitler’s regime and then lived in limbo in Portugal until they could reach safer havens abroad. Drawing attention not only to the social and physical... Read More
David Livingstone Smith, “On Inhumanity: Dehumanization and How to Resist It” (Oxford UP 2020)
The phenomenon of dehumanization is associated with such atrocities as the 1994 genocide in Rwanda and the Holocaust in World War II. In these and other cases, people are described in ways that imply that they are less than fully human as a prelude to committing extreme forms of violence... Read More
Richard Breitman, “The Journal of Holocaust and Genocide Studies”(Oxford Academic/USHMM)
The Journal of Holocaust and Genocide Studies is turning twenty-five.  One of the first academic journals focused on the study of the Holocaust and Genocide Studies, it has been one of a few journals that led the field in new directions. So it seemed appropriate to mark the moment by talking with... Read More
Nick Estes, “Our History is the Future” (Verso, 2019)
For the second time, Nick Estes has been gracious enough to participate in a New Books Network podcast to discuss his book Our History is the Future: Standing Rock versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance (Verso, 2019). (Listen to Ryan Tate’s interview for New... Read More
Sabine Hildebrandt, “The Anatomy of Murder: Ethical Transgressions and Anatomical Science during the Third Reich” (Berghahn, 2017)
Of the many medical specializations to transform themselves during the rise of National Socialism, anatomy has received relatively little attention from historians. While politics and racial laws drove many anatomists from the profession, most who remained joined the Nazi party, and some helped to develop the scientific basis for its... Read More