New Books Network

Andrew Leigh, “Randomistas: How Radical Researchers Are Changing Our World” (Yale UP, 2018)
From the unending quest to turn metal into gold to the major discoveries that reveal how the universe works, experiments have always been a critical part of the hard sciences. In recent decades social scientists have started to catch up and the results are shifting the way we do nearly... Read More
Sara Hughes, “Repowering Cities: Governing Climate Change Mitigation in New York City, Los Angeles, and Toronto” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Scholars like Ben Barber have suggested that cities provide the democratic culture to pragmatically problem-solve challenging policy issues – such as climate change. Many North American cities have announced ambitious goals to mitigate climate change, particularly the reduction of green house gases. In her new book Repowering Cities: Governing Climate... Read More
Elizabeth A. Wheeler, “HandiLand: The Crippest Place on Earth” (U Michigan Press, 2019)
Throughout her new book, HandiLand: The Crippest Place on Earth (University of Michigan Press 2019), Elizabeth A. Wheeler uses a fictional place called HandiLand as a yardstick for measuring how far American society has progressed toward social justice and how much remains to be done. In a rich array of... Read More
Diane Jones Allen, “Lost in the Transit Desert: Race, Transit Access, and Suburban Form” (Routledge, 2017)
Increased redevelopment, the dismantling of public housing, and increasing housing costs are forcing a shift in migration of lower income and transit dependent populations to the suburbs. These suburbs are often missing basic transportation, and strategies to address this are lacking. This absence of public transit creates barriers to viable... Read More
Josh Seim, “Bandage, Sort, and Hustle: Ambulance Crews on the Front Lines of Urban Suffering” (U California Press, 2020)
What is the role of the ambulance in the American city? The prevailing narrative provides a rather simple answer: saving and transporting the critically ill and injured. This is not an incorrect description, but it is incomplete. Drawing on field observations, medical records, and his own experience as a novice... Read More
Sandro Galea, “Well: What We Need to Talk About When We Talk About Health” (Oxford UP, 2019)
In Well: What We Need to Talk About When We Talk About Health (Oxford University Press, 2019), physician Sandro Galea examines what Americans miss when they fixate on healthcare: health. Americans spend more money on health than people anywhere else in the world. And what do they get for it?... Read More
Jennifer E. Gaddis, “The Labor of Lunch: Why We Need Real Food and Real Jobs in American Public Schools” (U California Press, 2019)
There’s a problem with school lunch in America. Big Food companies have largely replaced the nation’s school cooks by supplying cafeterias with cheap, precooked hamburger patties and chicken nuggets chock-full of industrial fillers. Yet it’s no secret that meals cooked from scratch with nutritious, locally sourced ingredients are better for... Read More