New Books Network

Leah Stokes, “Short Circuiting Policy: Interest Groups and the Battle Over Clean Energy” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Why do even successful clean energy policies fail to create momentum for more renewable energy? In her new book Short Circuiting Policy: Interest Groups and the Battle Over Clean Energy and Climate Policy in the American States (Oxford University Press, 2020), Leah Stokes analyzes policy-making in Texas, Kansas, Arizona, and... Read More
Daniel Denvir, “All-American Nativism: How the Bipartisan War on Immigrants Explains Politics as We Know It” (Verso, 2020)
It is often said that with the election of Donald Trump nativism was raised from the dead. After all, here was a president who organized his campaign around a rhetoric of unvarnished racism and xenophobia. Among his first acts on taking office was to issue an executive order blocking Muslim... Read More
Nancy D. Campbell, “OD: Naloxone and the Politics of Overdose” (MIT Press, 2020)
For years, drug overdose was unmentionable in polite society. OD was understood to be something that took place in dark alleys―an ugly death awaiting social deviants―neither scientifically nor clinically interesting. But over the last several years, overdose prevention has become the unlikely object of a social movement, powered by the... Read More
Ian Wray, “No Little Plans: How Government Built America’s Wealth and Infrastructure” (Routledge, 2019)
Is planning for America anathema to the pursuit of life, liberty and happiness? Is it true, as thinkers such as Friedrich Von Hayek, Milton Friedman, and Ayn Rand have claimed, that planning leads to dictatorship, that the state is economically  inefficient, and that prosperity is owed primarily to the workings... Read More
Nicci Gerrard, “The Last Ocean: A Journey Through Memory and Forgetting” (Penguin, 2019)
Dementia provokes profound moral questions about our society and the meaning of life itself. How much are we connected to one another? In what ways are we distant and separated? What does it mean to have a self? How can we offer dignity to those who suffer from Alzheimer’s and... Read More
Maria Dimova-Cookson, “Rethinking Positive and Negative Liberty” (Routledge, 2019)
Maria Dimova-Cookson‘s new book Rethinking Positive and Negative Liberty (Routledge, 2019) offers an analysis of the distinction between positive and negative freedom building on the work of Constant, Green and Berlin. The author proposes a new reading of this distinction for the twenty-first century. The author defends the idea that... Read More
Wendy Bottero, “A Sense of Inequality” (Roman and Littlefield, 2020)
How should we understand inequality? In A Sense of Inequality (Roman and Littlefield, 2020), Wendy Bottero, a Reader in Sociology at the University of Manchester, offers a detailed and challenging new approach to how we conceive of, how we study, and how we might challenge, social inequality. The book contends... Read More