New Books Network

Jeanette M. Fregulia, “A Rich and Tantalizing Brew: A History of How Coffee Connected the World” (U Arkansas Press, 2019))
In this this interview, Carrie Tippen talks with Jeanette M. Fregulia about the movements of coffee beans, coffee drinking, and coffee houses from Ethiopia and Yemen, across the Mediterranean region, through Western Europe, and to the Americas. In A Rich and Tantalizing Brew: A History of How Coffee Connected the... Read More
Jennifer Hubbert, “China in the World: An Anthropology of Confucius Institutes, Soft Power, and Globalization” (U Hawaii Press, 2019)
In recent years, Confucius Institutes—cultural and language programs funded by the Chinese government—have garnered attention in the United States due to a debate over whether they threaten free speech and academic freedom. In addition to this, much of the scholarly work on Confucius Institutes analyzes policy documents. Anthropologist Jennifer Hubbert... Read More
Kristen R. Ghodsee, “Second World, Second Sex: Socialist Women’s Activism and Global Solidarity during the Cold War” (Duke UP, 2019)
Last week, I had the privilege to talk with Dr. Kristen R. Ghodsee about her most recent book Second World, Second Sex: Socialist Women’s Activism and Global Solidarity during the Cold War (Duke University Press, 2019) and the behind-the-scene details of its making. Ghodsee is a professor in Russian and... Read More
Jonathan Fennell, “Fighting the People’s War: The British and Commonwealth Armies and the Second World War” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Jonathan Fennell’s new book, Fighting the People’s War: The British and Commonwealth Armies and the Second World War (Cambridge University Press, 2019) is an unprecedented, panoramic history of the ‘citizen armies’ of the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, India, New Zealand and South Africa, the core of the British and Commonwealth... Read More
Heidi Tworek, “News from Germany: The Competition to Control World Communications, 1900-1945” (Harvard UP, 2019)
In our current moment marred by media monopolies and disinformation campaigns, it is easy to get caught up in the dizzying temporality of the news cycle and think these are new phenomena. Heidi Tworek’s impressive new book, News from Germany: The Competition to Control World Communications, 1900-1945 (Harvard University Press, 2019),... Read More
Mark Peterson, “The City-State of Boston: The Rise and Fall of an Atlantic Power” (Princeton UP, 2019)
In the vaunted annals of America’s founding, Boston has long been held up as an exemplary “city upon a hill” and the “cradle of liberty” for an independent United States. Wresting this iconic urban center from these misleading, tired clichés, The City-State of Boston: The Rise and Fall of an Atlantic... Read More
Jane Hooper, “Feeding Globalization: Madagascar and the Provisioning Trade, 1600-1800” (Ohio UP, 2017)
Madagascar lies so close to the African coast–and so near the predictable wind system of the Indian Ocean–that it’s easy to overlook the island, the fourth largest in the world, when talking about oceanic trade and exploration. But there is a lot to tell. Jane Hooper talks about Madagascar and... Read More