New Books Network

Lucy Delap, “Feminisms: A Global History” (U Chicago Press, 2020)
Today Jana Byars talks to Lucy Delap, Reader in Modern British and Gender History at Murray Edwards College, Cambridge University, about her new book Feminisms: A Global History (University of Chicago Press, 2020). This outstanding work, available later this year, takes a thematic approach to the topic of global feminist... Read More
Eric Holthaus, “The Future Earth: A Radical Vision for What’s Possible in the Age of Warming” (HarperOne, 2020)
We sit at the beginning of what could be “both a truly terrifying and a golden era in humanity.” In The Future Earth: A Radical Vision for What’s Possible in the Age of Warming (HarperOne, 2020), leading climate change advocate and weather-related journalist Eric Holthaus (“the Rebel Nerd of Meteorology”­–Rolling... Read More
Michael Schuman, “Superpower Interrupted: The Chinese History of the World” (PublicAffairs, 2020)
We stand on the eve of a different kind of world, but comprehending it is difficult: we are so accustomed to dealing with the paradigms of the contemporary world that we inevitably take them for granted, believing that they are set in concrete rather than themselves being the subject of... Read More
Alanna O’Malley, “The Diplomacy of Decolonisation: America, Britain, and the United Nations during the Congo Crisis, 1960-1964” (Manchester UP, 2020)
In the summer of 1960, the Republic of the Congo won its independence from Belgium. Only one week later, however, Belgium had already dispatched paratroopers into the country and the Congolese government was appealing to the United Nations to intervene and protect Congolese sovereignty. The ensuing crisis, as Alanna O’Malley... Read More
Steven J. L. Taylor, “Exiles, Entrepreneurs, and Educators: African Americans in Ghana” (SUNY Press, 2019)
African Americans have a long history of emigration. In Exiles, Entrepreneurs, and Educators: African Americans in Ghana, Steven J. L. Taylor explores the second wave of African American exiles or repatriates to Ghana in post-1980s. Unlike the first wave of emigrants during the Kwame Nkrumah years (1957-1966), Taylor argues that... Read More
E. Bruce Geelhoed, “Diplomacy Shot Down: The U-2 Crisis and Eisenhower’s Aborted Mission to Moscow, 1959–1960” (U Oklahoma Press, 2020)
The history of the Cold War is littered with what-ifs, and in Diplomacy Shot Down: The U-2 Crisis and Eisenhower’s Aborted Mission to Moscow, 1959–1960 (University of Oklahoma Press, 2020), Professor of History, E. Bruce Geelhoed  of Ball State University explores one of the most intriguing: What if the Soviets had not shot... Read More
Catherine Belton, “Putin’s People: How the KGB Took Back Russia and Then Took on the West” (FSG, 2020)
The Russian state is back. That may not be a big surprise to Russia watchers. The degree to which it is a KGB state, however, is documented in great detail in Catherine Belton‘s new book Putin’s People: How the KGB Took Back Russia and Then Took on the West (Farrar, Straus and... Read More
George Lawson, “Anatomies of Revolution” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
The success of populist politicians and the emergence of social justice movements around the world, and the recent demonstrations against police violence in the United States, demonstrate a widespread desire for fundamental political, economic, and social change, albeit not always in a leftwards direction. What can movements and parties that... Read More
Thomas C. Field Jr. et al., “Latin America and the Global Cold War” (UNC Press, 2020)
Latin America and the Global Cold War (University of North Carolina Press, 2020) analyzes more than a dozen of Latin America’s forgotten encounters with Africa, Asia, and the Communist world, and by placing the region in meaningful dialogue with the wider Global South, this volume produces the first truly global... Read More