The Westminster Assembly (1643-53) was one of the most important ecclesiastical councils in the history of Reformed Protestantism, but until very recently it had...

The Westminster Assembly (1643-53) was one of the most important ecclesiastical councils in the history of Reformed Protestantism, but until very recently it had received little in the way of scholarly attention. With the rediscovery of the minutes of the assembly, and their publication in 5 volumes by Oxford University Press, historians are now able to see inside its workings, and to understand how the doctrines of its famous confession of faith were established. Working on this exciting frontier of historical-theological scholarship, Whitney G. Gamble, who teaches biblical and theological studies at Providence Christian College in Pasadena, California, has published an outstanding account of the assembly’s response to its theological bogeyman – the popularisation of the claim, made possible by the sudden collapse of censorship, that Christians had no moral obligations at all. Her new work, Christ and the Law: Antinomianism at the Westminster Assembly (Reformation Heritage Books, 2018), shows how seriously assembly members took the new antinomian threat, and how challenging was their effort to shut it down.


Crawford Gribben is a professor of history at Queen’s University Belfast. His research interests focus on the history of puritanism and evangelicalism, and he is the author most recently of John Owen and English Puritanism (Oxford University Press, 2016).