New Books Network

Lindsey Green-Simms, “Postcolonial Automobility: Car Culture in West Africa” (U Minnesota Press, 2019)
Cars promise freedom, autonomy, and above all, movement but leave whole cities stuck in traffic, breathing polluted air, exposed of deadly crashes, and dependent on vast the vast infrastructures of road networks, and oil production. Postcolonial Automobility: Car Culture in West Africa (University of Minnesota Press, 2019) examines the paradoxes... Read More
Polina Kroik, “Cultural Production and the Politics of Women’s Work in American Film and Literature” (Routledge, 2019)
How does thinking about gender and work help to rethink cultural hierarchies? In Cultural Production and the Politics of Women’s Work in American Film and Literature (Routledge, 2019), Polina Kroik, who teaches at Fordham University and Baruch College, CUNY, explores the relationship between work and gender in American culture. The... Read More
David Resnick, “Representing Education In Film: How Hollywood Portrays Educational Thought, Settings and Issues” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018)
David Resnick combines two of his passions, movies and education, in his book, Representing Education In Film: How Hollywood Portrays Educational Thought, Settings and Issues (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018). Films are powerful messengers which both project and reflect particular values, ideas and social behavior. Using many examples of Hollywood movies, Resnick... Read More
Liat Steir-Livny, “Remaking Holocaust Memory: Documentary Cinema by Third Generation Survivors in Israel” (Syracuse UP, 2019)
The Holocaust was and remains a central trauma in Israel’s national consciousness. It has found ample expressions in Israeli documentary cinema from 1945 until the present. Third-generation Holocaust survivors were born between the late 1960s and the early 1980s. They grew up in a society which acts out the trauma... Read More
Eleonory Gilburd, “To See Paris and Die: The Soviet Lives of Western Culture” (Harvard UP, 2018)
Josef Stalin’s death in 1953 marked a noticeable shift in Soviet attitudes towards the West.  A nation weary of war and terror welcomed with relief the new regime of Nikita Khrushchev and its focus on peaceful cooperation with foreign powers.  A year after Stalin’s death, author and commentator Ilya Ehrenburg... Read More
Sara K. Eskridge, “Rube Tube: CBS and Rural Comedy in the Sixties” (U Missouri Press, 2019)
The television comedies of the 1960s set in the American South epitomize American innocence. But in their original historical, social, and commercial context, their portrayals of southern life and their omissions of political events and people of color raise questions about how these television programs have been embraced, then and... Read More
Brian Cremins, “Captain Marvel and the Art of Nostalgia” (UP of Mississippi, 2017)
Brian Cremins‘ book Captain Marvel and the Art of Nostalgia (University Press of Mississippi, 2017) explores the history of Billy Batson, a boy who met a wizard that allowed him to transform into a superhero. When Billy says, “Shazam!” he becomes Captain Marvel. Cremins’ explores the history of artist C.C.... Read More