New Books Network

Eliot Borenstein, “Plots Against Russia: Conspiracy and Fantasy after Socialism” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Since the demise of the Soviet Union in 1991, conspiratorial thinking has taken deep root in contemporary Russia, moving from the margins to the forefront of cultural, historical, and political discourse and fueled by centuries-long prejudices and new paranoias. In his characteristically witty, irreverent style, Eliot Borenstein (Professor of Russian... Read More
Margaret Leslie Davis , “The Lost Gutenberg: The Astounding Story of One Book’s Five-Hundred-Year Odyssey” (TarcherPerigee, 2019)
Of the millions of books that have been published, few are as renowned or as coveted today by collectors as the famous Bible printed in the 15th century by Johannes Gutenberg. In The Lost Gutenberg: The Astounding Story of One Book’s Five-Hundred-Year Odyssey (TarcherPerigee, 2019), Margaret Leslie Davis traces the... Read More
Shonaleeka Kaul, “The Making of Early Kashmir: Landscape and Identity in the Rajatarangini” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Dr. Shonaleeka Kaul is a cultural historian of early South Asia specializing in working with Sanskrit texts. She is Associate Professor at the Centre for Historical Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, and has worked extensively on Sanskrit kavya, a genre of highly aesthetic poetry and prose. She is the author of... Read More
Thomas A. Wayment, “The New Testament: A Translation for Latter-day Saints” (BYU, 2019)
Dr. Thomas A. Wayment, professor of Classics at Brigham Young University, has done something remarkable — he has retranslated the New Testament. This new translation from the best available Greek manuscripts, entitled, The New Testament: A Translation for Latter-day Saints (Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2019), renders the New... Read More
Ralph James Savarese, “See It Feelingly: Classic Novels, Autistic Readers, and the Schooling of a No-Good English Professor” (Duke UP, 2018)
From the earliest days of medical research into autism, both psychologists and the general public have characterised those on the autism spectrum as literal-minded, unimaginative and lacking in empathy. While in recent years a fresh emphasis on neurodiversity has served to sweep aside this kind of reductive thinking, many people... Read More