New Books Network

William Germano, “Getting it Published: A Guide for Scholars and Anyone Else Serious about Serious Books” (U Chicago Press, 2016)
When I put down Getting it Published: A Guide for Scholars and Anyone Else Serious about Serious Books (University of Chicago Press, 2016), I looked up and began to wonder. I wondered about the book on gnomic poetry in Medieval Greek I had read over the weekend. I wondered about the... Read More
Margrit Pernau, “Emotions and Modernity in Colonial India: From Balance to Fervor” (Oxford UP, 2020)
In her stunning and conceptually adventurous new book Emotions and Modernity in Colonial India: From Balance to Fervor (Oxford University Press, 2020), Margrit Pernau examines the varied and hugely consequential expressions of and normative investments in emotions in modern South Asian Muslim thought. By considering a wide array of sources... Read More
Nadia Nurhussein, “Black Land: Imperial Ethiopianism and African America” (Princeton UP, 2019)
In Black Land: Imperial Ethiopianism and African America (Princeton University Press, 2019), Nadia Nurhussein explores late nineteenth and twentieth century African American cultural engagement with and literary depictions of imperial Ethiopia. Widely celebrated as one of two African nations to resist European colonization in the age of modern imperialism, Ethiopia... Read More
Robert Bartlett, “Against Demagogues: What Aristophanes Can Teach Us about the Perils of Populism and the Fate of Democracy” (U California Press, 2020)
With Against Demagogues: What Aristophanes Can Teach Us about the Perils of Populism and the Fate of Democracy (University of California Press, 2020) Robert Bartlett provides a stirring argument for the relevance of comic playwright Aristophanes as a serious political and philosophical thinker. In his translations of two lesser-known plays,... Read More
Sianne Ngai, “Theory of the Gimmick: Aesthetic Judgment and Capitalist Form” (Harvard UP, 2020)
In Theory of the Gimmick: Aesthetic Judgment and Capitalist Form (Harvard University Press, 2020), Sianne Ngai continues her theoretical work of demystifying the vernacular aesthetic categories encountered in late capitalist daily life. In this witty and penetrating book-length treatment of the affective experience of the “gimmick,” Ngai draws upon formalist... Read More
Christopher Lupke (trans.), “A History of Taiwan Literature” (Cambria Press, 2020)
Ye Shitao was a Taiwanese public intellectual who rose to prominence in the second half of the twentieth century. His encyclopedic A History of Taiwan Literature was published in 1987, the same year that the island’s decades-long period of martial law came to an end. The book provides a thorough... Read More
K. Grenier and A. Mushal, “Cultures of Memory in the Nineteenth Century: Consuming Commemoration” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020)
Cultures of Memory in the Nineteenth Century: Consuming Commemoration (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020) explores commemorative practices as they developed in the nineteenth century. The editors of the volume, Katherine Grenier and Amanda Mushal, and its contributors invite the readers to consider memorial practices as insights into the culture of both the... Read More
John Locke, “Queen of the Gangsters: Stories by Margie Harris” (Off-Trail Publications, 2011)
Queen of the Gangsters: Stories by Margie Harris (Off-Trail Publications, 2011),  is the first anthology of work of crime fiction writer Margie Harris. Edited by John Locke, Queen of the Gangsters bring the work of Harris, the first woman hardboiled crime fiction writer in history, to a larger audience. During... Read More
Joshua Kotin, “Utopias of One” (Princeton UP, 2017)
Joshua Kotin’s Utopias of One (Princeton University Press, 2017) analyzes a particular and peculiar sub-genre of utopian literature. Kotin identifies works by Thoreau, Dubois, the Mandel’shtams, and the poets Wallace Stevens, Ezra Pound, and J.H. Prynne as “utopias of one.” In these works, the authors at one and the same... Read More
R. Rosenberg and R. Rubinstein, “Teaching Jewish American Literature” (MLA, 2020)
In this interview, Roberta Rosenberg and Rachel Rubinstein (editors), engage  our listeners in a conversation about different approaches to teaching Jewish American Literature, complicating what it means to be “American”.  Teaching Jewish American Literature (MLA, 2020) consciously pushes against the boundaries of the canon, and undermine the stereotype of the... Read More