New Books Network

Lincoln A. Mitchell, “San Francisco Year Zero” (Rutgers UP, 2019)
1978 was the year that changed San Francisco forever, writes Lincoln A. Mitchell in San Francisco Year Zero: Political Upheaval, Punk Rock and a Third-Place Baseball Team (Rutgers University Press, 2019). After the long hangover from the heady 1960s and summer of love, San Francisco was, by the late ‘70s,... Read More
Mark Alizart, “Dogs” (Polity, 2019)
Man’s best friend, domesticated since prehistoric times, a travelling companion for explorers and artists, thinkers and walkers, equally happy curled up by the fire and bounding through the great outdoors―dogs matter to us because we love them. But is that all there is to the canine’s good-natured voracity and affectionate... Read More
Jonathan Rees, “Before the Refrigerator: How We Used to Get Ice” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2018)
Frederic Tudor was the “Ice King” of early nineteenth-century America. It was Tudor who realized that ice, harvested from New England ponds and rivers could be shipped to the Caribbean. Shipping was cheap, because ships often went empty to pick up cargo; insulation could be made from sawdust, a waste... Read More
Liz Gloyn, “Tracking Classical Monsters in Popular Culture” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019)
What is it about ancient monsters that popular culture still finds so enthralling? Why do the monsters of antiquity continue to stride across the modern world? In Tracking Classical Monsters in Popular Culture (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019), the first in-depth study of how post-classical societies use the creatures from ancient myth,... Read More
Jim Clarke, “Science Fiction and Catholicism: The Rise and Fall of the Robot Papacy” (Gylphi, 2019)
Ah, science fiction: Aliens? Absolutely. Robots? Of course. But why are there so many priests in space? As Jim Clarke writes in Science Fiction and Catholicism: The Rise and Fall of the Robot Papacy (Gylphi, 2019), science fiction has had an obsession with Roman Catholicism for over a century. The... Read More
Nina Sun Eidsheim, “The Race of Sound: Listening, Timbre and Vocality in African American Music” (Duke UP, 2019)
In 2018, Nicolle R. Holliday and Daniel Villarreal published the results of a study they conducted asking people to rank how “black” President Obama sounded when given four different examples of his speech. Dr. Nina Sun Eidsheim’s latest book, The Race of Sound: Listening Timbre and Vocality in African American... Read More
Aisha Shillingford and Terry Marshall, “Black Freedom Beyond Borders: Re-Imaging Gender in Wakanda” (WDL, 2019)
Wakanda Dream Lab’s anthology, Black Freedom Beyond Borders: Re-Imaging Gender in Wakanda, features the work of writers, artists, and activists, as they imagine gender justice through the framework of Wakanda. The various stories and pieces are creative and thought-provoking as they center the voices, experiences, and visions of Black and... Read More