New Books Network

Jeffrey Ostler, “Surviving Genocide: Native Nations and the United States from the American Revolution to Bleeding Kansas” (Yale UP, 2019)
Jeffrey Ostler’s Surviving Genocide: Native Nations and the United States from the American Revolution to Bleeding Kansas (Yale University Press, 2019) is the first of what will be a two-volume set that comprehensively chronicles the devastating effects of U.S. expansionism on Native Nations. Surviving Genocide covers the eastern United States... Read More
Bathsheba Demuth, “Floating Coast: An Environmental History of the Bering Strait” (W. W. Norton, 2019)
Whales and walruses, caribou and fox, gold and oil: through the stories of these animals and resources, Bathsheba Demuth reveals how people have turned ecological wealth in a remote region into economic growth and state power for more than 150 years. The first-ever comprehensive history of Beringia, the Arctic land... Read More
Harriet Washington, “A Terrible Thing to Waste: Environmental Racism and Its Assault on the American Mind” (Little, Brown Spark, 2019)
Environmental racism is visible not only as cancer clusters or the location of grocery stores. It is responsible for the reported gap in IQ scores between white Americans and Black, Latinx, and Native Americans. So argues science writer Harriet Washington in A Terrible to Waste: Environmental Racism and Its Assault... Read More
Christine M. DeLucia, “Memory Lands: King Philip’s War and the Place of Violence in the Northeast” (Yale UP, 2018)
Christine M. DeLucia is the author of Memory Lands: King Philip’s War and the Place of Violence in the Northeast, published by Yale University Press in 2018. Memory Lands provides a much needed new account of King Philip’s War which centers the Natives of the Northeast, instead of the English... Read More
Andrew Newman, “Allegories of Encounter: Colonial Literacy and Indian Captivities” (UNC Press, 2019)
In Allegories of Encounter: Colonial Literacy and Indian Captivities (University of North Carolina Press—Chapel Hill & The Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, 2019), Andrew Newman, Professor of English at Stony Brook University, analyzes depictions of reading, writing, and recollecting texts in Indian captivity narratives. While histories of literacy and... Read More
Dean Itsuji Saranillio, “Unsustainable Empire: Alternative Histories of Hawai‘i Statehood” (Duke UP, 2018)
In Unsustainable Empire: Alternative Histories of Hawai‘i Statehood (Duke University Press, 2018), Dean Itsuji Saranillio offers a bold challenge to conventional understandings of Hawai‘i’s admission as a U.S. state. Hawai‘i statehood is popularly remembered as a civil rights victory against racist claims that Hawai‘i was undeserving of statehood because it... Read More
Douglas K. Miller, “Indians on the Move: Native American Mobility and Urbanization in the Twentieth Century” (UNC Press, 2019)
In 1972, the Bureau of Indian Affairs terminated its twenty-year-old Voluntary Relocation Program, which encouraged the mass migration of roughly 100,000 Native American people from rural to urban areas. At the time the program ended, many groups–from government leaders to Red Power activists–had already classified it as a failure, and... Read More