New Books Network

Melissa Faliveno, “Tomboyland: Essays” (Topple Books and Little A, 2020)
Writers often evoke the famous que sais-je (“What do I know?”) of Michel de Montaigne, father of the literary essay. Montaigne was known for his deeply exploratory writing about the many overlapping and often conflicting aspects of selfhood. His Essais in the 16th century laid the foundation for the genre... Read More
Alice Connor, “Fierce: Women of the Bible and Their Stories of Violence, Mercy, Bravery, Wisdom, Sex, and Salvation” (Fortress, 2017)
Women in the Bible aren’t shy or retiring; they’re fierce and funny and demanding and relevant to 21st-century people. Women in the Bible—some of their names we know, others we’ve only heard, and others are tragically unnamed. In Fierce: Women of the Bible and Their Stories of Violence, Mercy, Bravery,... Read More
Post Script: Kamala Harris as Vice President
This is our second podcast in a new series from New Books in Political Science called POST-SCRIPT in which Susan and I invite authors back to the podcast to react to contemporary political developments that engage their scholarship. Today’s podcast – recorded on Wednesday, August 12th (less than 24 hours... Read More
Annette Joseph-Gabriel, “Reimagining Liberation: How Black Women Transformed Citizenship in the French Empire” (Illinois UP, 2020)
‘Where were the women?’ was the big question that led Annette Joseph-Gabriel to her new book, Reimagining Liberation: How Black Women Transformed Citizenship in the French Empire (University of Illinois Press, 2020). This ‘where’ ended up meaning different things as she tracked the lives, ideas, and roles played by Black... Read More
Caron Gentry, “Disordered Violence: How Gender, Race and Heteronormativity Structure Terrorism” (Edinburgh UP, 2020)
In Disordered Violence: How Gender, Race and Heteronormativity Structure Terrorism (Edinburgh University Press, 2020), Caron Gentry looks at how gender, race, and heteronormative expectations of public life shape Western understandings of terrorism as irrational, immoral and illegitimate. Gentry examines the profiles of 8 well-known terrorist actors. Gentry identifies the gendered,... Read More
Sasha Abramsky, “Little Wonder: The Fabulous Story of Lottie Dod, the World’s First Female Sports Superstar” (Akashic Books, 2020)
Today we are joined by Sasha Abramsky, author of Little Wonder: The Fabulous Story of Lottie Dod, the World’s First Female Sports Superstar (Akashic Books, 2020). Lottie Dod is not a familiar name among casual sports fans but should be. She won the first of her five Wimbledon titles when... Read More
Polly E. Bugros McLean, “Remembering Lucile: A Virginia Family’s Rise from Slavery and a Legacy Forged a Mile High” (UP of Colorado, 2018)
In 1918 Lucile Berkeley Buchanan Jones received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Colorado, becoming its first female African American graduate (though she was not allowed to “walk” at graduation, nor is she pictured in the 1918 CU yearbook). In Remembering Lucile: A Virginia Family’s Rise from Slavery and... Read More
Amy Von Lintel, “Georgia O’Keeffe’s Wartime Texas Letters” (Texas A&M UP, 2020)
In 1912, at age 24, Georgia O’Keeffe boarded a train in Virginia and headed west, to the prairies of the Texas Panhandle, to take a position as art teacher for the newly organized Amarillo Public Schools. Subsequently she would join the faculty at what was then West Texas State Normal... Read More
Nwando Achebe, “Female Monarchs and Merchant Queens in Africa” (Ohio UP, 2020)
In this unapologetically African-centered monograph, Nwando Achebe considers the diverse forms and systems of female leadership in both the physical and spiritual worlds, as well as the complexities of female power in a multiplicity of distinct African societies. From Amma to the goddess inkosazana, Sobekneferu to Nzingha, Nehanda to Ahebi... Read More