New Books Network

Thomas Hager, “Ten Drugs: How Plants, Powders, and Pills Have Shaped the History of Medicine” (Harry N. Abrams, 2019)
Behind every landmark drug is a story. It could be a researcher’s genius insight, a catalyzing moment in geopolitical history, a new breakthrough technology, or an unexpected but welcome side effect discovered during clinical trials. In his new book, Ten Drugs: How Plants, Powders, and Pills Have Shaped the History... Read More
David Sinclair, “Lifespan: Why We Age and Why We Don’t Have To” (Simon and Schuster, 2019)
Today’s guest is David Sinclair, professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School and co-director of the Paul Glenn Center Biological Mechanisms of Aging. He is widely considered on the world’s foremost experts on longevity research. A co-founder of the journal Aging and several biotech companies, he also hold 35 patents.... Read More
Nora Jaffary, “Reproduction and its Discontents in Mexico: Childbirth and Contraception from 1750 to 1905” (UNC Press, 2016)
Nora Jaffary’s Reproduction and its Discontents in Mexico: Childbirth and Contraception from 1750 to 1905 (University of North Carolina Press. 2016), tracks how medical ideas, practices, and policies surrounding reproduction changed between the late eighteenth and early twentieth centuries in Mexico. Perhaps the most important change analyzed in the book, and... Read More
Judith Grisel, “Never Enough: The Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction” (Doubleday, 2019)
Not a lot of authors go from spending their early twenties homeless and addicted to cocaine to becoming one of the world’s leading researchers on the neuroscience of addiction. But Dr. Judith Grisel, in her new book Never Enough: The Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction (Doubleday, 2019), uses her personal... Read More
Travis Rieder, “In Pain: A Bioethicist’s Personal Struggle with Opioids” (Harper Collins, 2019)
On a spring day in 2015, Dr. Travis Rieder’s life changed. A motorcycle accident, a shattered foot, and a long series of surgeries later, the Johns Hopkins University bioethicist had a far deeper understanding of opioid use in America than he ever planned. In his new book In Pain: A... Read More
Harriet Washington, “A Terrible Thing to Waste: Environmental Racism and Its Assault on the American Mind” (Little, Brown Spark, 2019)
Environmental racism is visible not only as cancer clusters or the location of grocery stores. It is responsible for the reported gap in IQ scores between white Americans and Black, Latinx, and Native Americans. So argues science writer Harriet Washington in A Terrible to Waste: Environmental Racism and Its Assault... Read More
Shai Lavi, “Bioethics and Biopolitics in Israel: Socio-legal, Political and Empirical Analysis” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Once upon a time, or so we’ve been told, medical ethics were confined to the patient-doctor relationship. As long as doctors were true to their Hippocratic oaths, as long as they acted with compassion and wisdom, then all expectations were met. Life is more complicated today, and so is healthcare:... Read More