New Books Network

Nancy D. Campbell, “OD: Naloxone and the Politics of Overdose” (MIT Press, 2020)
For years, drug overdose was unmentionable in polite society. OD was understood to be something that took place in dark alleys―an ugly death awaiting social deviants―neither scientifically nor clinically interesting. But over the last several years, overdose prevention has become the unlikely object of a social movement, powered by the... Read More
Christina Adams, “Camel Crazy” (New World Library, 2019)
Today I’m speaking with author Christina Adams, and Adams has something of a surprising muse: camels. That’s right, camels. One hump, two humps, crossing the Egyptian desert or the Siberian tundra. Adams’ muse is surprising, because she lives, like many of us, in North America—Orange County, California, to be exact.... Read More
Nicci Gerrard, “The Last Ocean: A Journey Through Memory and Forgetting” (Penguin, 2019)
Dementia provokes profound moral questions about our society and the meaning of life itself. How much are we connected to one another? In what ways are we distant and separated? What does it mean to have a self? How can we offer dignity to those who suffer from Alzheimer’s and... Read More
Jessica Lynne Pearson, “The Colonial Politics of Global Health: France and the United Nations in Postwar Africa” (Harvard UP, 2018)
International organizations throw up several obstacles—their immense scale, their dry bureaucratic language—to the historian trying to piece together their past. In her book, The Colonial Politics of Global Health: France and the United Nations in Postwar Africa (Harvard University Press, 2018), Jessica Lynne Pearson steers clear of these obstacles and... Read More
Rachel Louise Moran, “Governing Bodies: American Politics and the Shaping of the Modern Physique” (U Penn Press, 2018)
How did the modern, American body come into being? According to Rachel Louise Moran this is a story to be told through the lens of the advisory state. In her book, Governing Bodies: American Politics and the Shaping of the Modern Physique (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018), she tracks the... Read More
Joe Miller, “US of AA: How the Twelve Steps Hijacked the Science of Alcoholism” (Chicago Review Press, 2019)
In the aftermath of Prohibition, America’s top scientists joined forces with members of a new group, called Alcoholics Anonymous, and put their clout behind a campaign to convince the nation that alcoholism was a disease rather than a moral failing. Their campaign spanned decades, and from it grew a multimillion-dollar... Read More
Babette Becker, “I Should Have Been Music” (Page Publishing, 2018)
Dr. Babette Becker’s memoir I Should Have Been Music (Page Publishing, 2018) recounts her experience as a patient in four different mental hospitals from 1957 to 1960. It was a time when little was known about mental illness, except the shame and horror of it, and nothing was known about... Read More