New Books Network

Melissa Kravetz, “Women Doctors in Weimar and Nazi Germany: Maternalism, Eugenics and Professional Identity” (U Toronto Press, 2019)
In her new book, Women Doctors in Weimar and Nazi Germany: Maternalism, Eugenics and Professional Identity (University of Toronto Press, 2019), Melissa Kravetz examines how German women physicians gained a foothold in the medical profession during the Weimar and Nazi periods, Women Doctors in Weimar and Nazi Germany reveals the... Read More
Travis Bell et al., “CTE, Media, and the NFL: Framing a Public Health Crisis as a Football Epidemic” (Lexington, 2019)
Today we are joined by Travis Bell, Janelle Applequist, and Christian Dotson-Pierson to discuss their new book CTE, Media, and the NFL: Framing a Public Health Crisis as a Football Epidemic (Lexington Books, 2019). In our conversation, we discussed public misconceptions about Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, the media’s problematic connection of... Read More
Tania Jenkins, “Doctors’ Orders: The Making of Status Hierarchies in an Elite Profession” (Columbia UP, 2020)
In her new book, Doctors’ Orders: The Making of Status Hierarchies in an Elite Profession (Columbia University Press, 2020), Dr. Tania Jenkins engages readers in readers in a ethnography where she spent years observing and interviewing American, international, and osteopathic medical residents in two hospitals to reveal the unspoken mechanisms... Read More
Josh Seim, “Bandage, Sort, and Hustle: Ambulance Crews on the Front Lines of Urban Suffering” (U California Press, 2020)
What is the role of the ambulance in the American city? The prevailing narrative provides a rather simple answer: saving and transporting the critically ill and injured. This is not an incorrect description, but it is incomplete. Drawing on field observations, medical records, and his own experience as a novice... Read More
Sandro Galea, “Well: What We Need to Talk About When We Talk About Health” (Oxford UP, 2019)
In Well: What We Need to Talk About When We Talk About Health (Oxford University Press, 2019), physician Sandro Galea examines what Americans miss when they fixate on healthcare: health. Americans spend more money on health than people anywhere else in the world. And what do they get for it?... Read More
Sarah Fawn Montgomery, “Quite Mad: An American Pharma Memoir” (Mad Creek Books, 2018)
If you live in America, chances are good you’ve heard the term “mental health crisis” bandied about in the media. While true that anxiety, depression, and other mood disorders seem to be on the rise—especially among young people—resources for addressing them remain scarce and stigmatized, and the conditions themselves remain... Read More
Daniel Skinner, “Medical Necessity: Health Care Access and the Politics of Decision Making” (U Minnesota Press, 2019)
The definition of medical necessity has morphed over the years, from a singular physician’s determination to a complex and dynamic political contest involving patients, medical companies, insurance companies, and government agencies. In Medical Necessity: Health Care Access and the Politics of Decision Making (University of Minnesota Press, 2019), Daniel Skinner... Read More