New Books Network

A. R. Ruis, “Eating to Learn, Learning to Eat: The Origins of School Lunch in the United States” (Rutgers UP, 2017)
In this this interview, Dr. Carrie Tippen talks with A.R. Ruis about the 2017 book Eating to Learn: Learning to Eat The Origins of School Lunch in the United States – published in 2017 by Rutgers University Press. Ruis narrates the development of school lunch programs from the late 19th... Read More
Stephen Le, “100 Million Years of Food: What Our Ancestors Ate and Why It Matters Today” (Picador, 2016)
There are few areas of modern life that are burdened by as much information and advice, often contradictory, as our diet and health: eat a lot of meat, eat no meat; whole-grains are healthy, whole-grains are a disaster; eat everything in moderation; eat only certain foods–and on and on. In... Read More
Rachel Laudan, “Cuisine and Empire: Cooking in World History” (U California Press, 2015)
With Al Zambone this week is Rachel Laudan, author of the fascinating Cuisine and Empire: Cooking in World History (University of California Press, 2015). Once a historian of science and technology, living and teaching in Hawaii made her a historian of food. In her book she describes the development and decline of cuisines... Read More
Rafia Zafar, “Recipes for Respect: African American Meals and Meaning” (U Georgia Press, 2019)
In this this interview, Dr. Carrie Tippen talks with Rafia Zafar about her 2019 book Recipes for Respect: African American Meals and Meaning, from the University of Georgia Press. It’s part of the Southern Foodways Alliance Studies in Culture, People and Place series. The book contains 7 chapters, covering the... Read More
Geoffrey Barstow, “Food of Sinful Demons: Meat, Vegetarianism, and the Limits of Buddhism in Tibet” (Columbia UP, 2018)
Tibetan Buddhism teaches compassion toward all beings, a category that explicitly includes animals. Slaughtering animals is morally problematic at best and, at worst, completely incompatible with a religious lifestyle. Yet historically most Tibetans—both monastic and lay—have made meat a regular part of their diet. In Food of Sinful Demons: Meat,... Read More
Ashanté M. Reese, “Black Food Geographies: Race, Self-Reliance, and Food Access in Washington, D.C.” (UNC Press, 2019)
Black Food Geographies: Race, Self-Reliance, and Food Access in Washington, D.C. (University of North Carolina Press, 2019), by Ashanté M. Reese, examines the ways in which residents of the Deanwood neighborhood navigate the surrounding area to acquire food. Reese examines the historical processes that gave rise to the decrease of... Read More
Jennifer Jensen Wallach, “What We Need Ourselves: How Food Has Shaped African American Life” (Rowman and Littlefield, 2019)
In this this interview, Dr. Carrie Tippen talks with Jennifer Jensen Wallach about the her book Getting What We Need Ourselves: How Food Has Shaped African American Life (Rowman & Littlefield, 2019). The book covers a wide chronology and geography from the continent of Africa pre-Transatlantic slave trade to lunch... Read More