New Books Network

Tiffany Florvil and Vanessa Plumly, “Rethinking Black German Studies: Approaches, Interventions, and Histories” (Peter Lang, 2018)
Black German Studies is an interdisciplinary field that has experienced significant growth over the past three decades, integrating subjects such as gender studies, diaspora studies, history, and media and performance studies. The field’s contextual roots as well as historical backdrop, nevertheless, span centuries. Rethinking Black German Studies: Approaches, Interventions, and... Read More
Sasha D. Pack, “The Deepest Border: The Strait of Gibraltar and the Making of the Hispano-African Border” (Stanford UP, 2019)
In his new book, The Deepest Border: The Strait of Gibraltar and the Making of the Hispano-African Border (Stanford, 2019), Sasha D. Pack considers the Strait of Gibraltar as an untamed in-between space—from “shatter zone” to borderland. Far from the centers of authority of contending empires, the North African and... Read More
Chris S. Duvall, “The African Roots of Marijuana” (Duke UP, 2019)
There’s so much discussion in the contemporary United States about marijuana. Debates focus on legalization and medicalization. Usually, Reefer Madness, Harry Anslinger, and race are brought into the conversation. But a big part of the larger marijuana story is missing. In Chris S. Duvall‘s new book, The African Roots of... Read More
Joseph Hill, “Wrapping Authority: Women Islamic Leaders in a Sufi Movement in Dakar, Senegal” (U Toronto Press, 2018)
Joseph Hill‘s new book Wrapping Authority: Women Islamic Leaders in a Sufi Movement in Dakar, Senegal (University of Toronto Press, 2018), is an ethnographic study of women Sufi leaders in the Taalibe Baay or Fayda branch of the Tijaniyya. Hill provides life stories of various fascinating and powerful female muqaddamas... Read More
Jeannette Eileen Jones, “Search of Brightest Africa: Reimagining the Dark Continent in American Culture, 1884-1936” (U Georgia Press, 2011)
When President Trump talked of Africa as a continent of “shithole countries” where people lived in huts, he was drawing on a set of ideas made popular in the 19th century. “Darkest Africa” became a favorite trope of explorers like Henry Morton Stanley who promoted his books and lectures by... Read More
Danell Jones, “An African in Imperial London: The Indomitable Life of A.B.C. Merriman-Labor” (Hurst, 2018)
In 1919 a man named Ohlohr Maigi died of tuberculosis in London, in deep poverty. He had arrived over a decade before in the imperial capital bearing different name, seeking education, fame and fortune. Some of these he had found, but ultimately he had found much more adversity than success.... Read More
Jane Hooper, “Feeding Globalization: Madagascar and the Provisioning Trade, 1600-1800” (Ohio UP, 2017)
Madagascar lies so close to the African coast–and so near the predictable wind system of the Indian Ocean–that it’s easy to overlook the island, the fourth largest in the world, when talking about oceanic trade and exploration. But there is a lot to tell. Jane Hooper talks about Madagascar and... Read More