New Books Network

John D. Hawks, “Almost Human: The Astonishing Tale of Homo naledi and the Discovery That Changed Our Human Story” (National Geographic, 2017)
John D. Hawks talks about new developments in paleoanthropology – the discovery of a new hominid species Homo Naledi in South Africa, the Neanderthal ancestry of many human populations, and the challenge of rethinking anthropological science’s relationship with indigenous peoples and the general public. Hawks is the Vilas-Borghesi Achievement Professor... Read More
Chika Watanabe, “Becoming One: Religion, Development, and Environmentalism in a Japanese NGO in Myanmar” (U Hawaii Press, 2019)
Chika Watanabe’s Becoming One: Religion, Development, and Environmentalism in a Japanese NGO in Myanmar (University of Hawaii Press, 2019) is a rich ethnographic study of the work of a Japanese NGO called the Organization for Industrial, Spiritual and Cultural Advancement. Watanabe’s deep dive into the daily workings of OISCA explores... Read More
Susan Brownell, “The Anthropology of Sport: Bodies, Borders, Biopolitics” (U California Press, 2018)
As my first guest, I’d would like to introduce Susan Brownell, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Missouri – St Louis, one of the authors of The Anthropology of Sport: Bodies, Borders, Biopolitics (University of California Press, 2018). During the course of the interview, we covered the subfield of... Read More
David Varel, “The Lost Black Scholar: Resurrecting Allison Davis in American Social Thought” (U Chicago Press, 2018)
Allison Davis (1902-1983) was a pioneering anthropologist who did ground-breaking fieldwork in the Jim Crow south,  challenged the racial bias of IQ tests, and became the first African American to be tenured at the University of Chicago. And yet despite these contributions Davis’s work is little read today. The Lost... Read More
Chinyere K. Osuji, “Boundaries of Love: Interracial Marriage and the Meaning of Race” (NYU Press, 2019)
The increasing presence of interracial relationships is often read as an antidote to racism or as an indicator of the decreasing significance of race. In her book, Boundaries of Love: Interracial Marriage and the Meaning of Race (NYU Press, 2019), Chinyere K. Osuji examines how interracial couples push against, navigate,... Read More
Michael E. Kerr, “Bowen Theory’s Secrets: Revealing the Hidden Life of Families” (Norton, 2019)
A pivotal development in the history of psychology was the invention of family systems theory by psychiatrist Murray Bowen. He was among the first to observe families in a naturalistic setting, and his observations informed his ideas about families as ‘systems’ that functioned as ‘emotional units.’ Michael E. Kerr served... Read More
M. D. Foster and J. A. Tolbert, “The Folkloresque: Reframing Folklore in a Popular Culture World” (Utah State UP, 2015)
This volume introduces a new concept to explore the dynamic relationship between folklore and popular culture: the “folkloresque.” With “folkloresque,” Foster and Tolbert name the product created when popular culture appropriates or reinvents folkloric themes, characters, and images. Such manufactured tropes are traditionally considered outside the purview of academic folklore... Read More